Closer Readings

405 Result(s)
Summer Days & Nights with the NEH

Whether you are taking a long road trip, headed to a local museum, or hanging around the house this summer, you will find that the National Endowment for the Humanities is just around the corner (or already in your hands). This collection of resources highlights NEH sponsored programs available across the country and includes projects aligned with some of the 50th anniversary events being commemorated this summer—most notably Stonewall, the moon landing, and Woodstock. No matter your summer plans, you don’t have to go far to enjoy a NEH sponsored exhibition or program.

Everything Your Students Need to Know About Immigration History

Teach Immigration History from the University of Texas at Austin explains the important and complicated history of immigration to the United States for general audiences and high school teachers of U.S. history and civics courses.  The backbone of the website is an 80-item chronology of key events, laws, and court rulings that are further explained by a dozen thematic lesson plans on topics such as citizenship, an overview of major laws, gender and immigration, and migration within the Americas.  

Jazz Beyond Borders: Jazz Appreciation Month 2019

Now celebrated in more than 40 countries, Jazz Appreciation Month offers an opportunity to explore cultural dynamics that inform jazz music across places, as well as the idiosyncratic ways in which jazz artists reimagine and perform their local for the global.

Chronicling and Picturing America

Created through a partnership of The National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress, Chronicling America offers visitors the ability to search and view newspaper pages from 1690-1963 and to find information about American newspapers published between 1690–present using the National Digital Newspaper Program.

Arturo Schomburg and African American History

Each February, Americans honor the rich and diverse history of African Americans. EDSITEment offers teaching resources to give students the chance to explore African American history through primary sources.

Slavery in the Colonial North

Philipsburg Manor, located in Sleepy Hollow, New York, is a historic site owned and operated by Historic Hudson Valley. The site tells the story of the 23 enslaved Africans who were the only full-time, year round residents of the Manor, and whose forced labor was the backbone of the Philipse’s international trading empire. In July 2019, Philipsburg Manor will host a summer teachers’ institute on Slavery in the Colonial North for K-12 teachers. For more information, visit www.HudsonValley.org.

Black History is U.S. History

In this special revised and updated feature for Black History Month, teachers, parents, and students will find a collection of NEH-supported websites and EDSITEment-developed lessons that tell the four-hundred-year old story of African Americans from slavery through freedom and citizenship to the presidency.

A Novel Way to Hitting the Books Again

In this Age of Common Core, English Language Arts teachers are always on the lookout for high quality articles on academic subjects which are part of the curriculum.

Bring Your Classroom to Life Through Diplomatic Oral Histories

When we think of using primary source oral histories in our classrooms, there is one resource that is often overlooked but ideally suited to the world history, civics, or global studies curriculum -- the oral histories of our diplomats.