Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat"

Stephen Crane found himself floating in a dinghy for thirty hours after The Commodore, the steamship he was on, wrecked on its way to Cuba. Those experiences informed his short story "The Open Boat." Alternating between the harrowing moments of waves crashing over the bow of the dinghy and the development of a certain kind of brotherhood in the face of overwhelming danger, "The Open Boat" remains one of Crane's best works and a wonderful example of American literary naturalism. In this lesson, students will examine the relationship of man and nature as portrayed in "The Open Boat."

Guiding Questions

What is the relationship of man and nature in Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat"?

Learning Objectives

In this lesson, students will learn how to: Examine critically the relationship of man and nature in "The Open Boat"

Understand third person, omniscient point of view

Conduct in-depth character analysis

Explore the depth of emotion evoked by Crane