Closer Readings

406 Result(s)
Addiction in American History

Is the United States experiencing a resurgence of addiction or has it always been a part of the nation’s darker past? In what ways has addiction affected families and communities across the country? What can we learn from the history of addiction treatment and how might these lessons better inform our present-day policies?

Grassroots Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement: Focus on Women

It is hard to imagine any movement more important for understanding the meaning of freedom and equal rights in the U.S. than the civil rights struggle in the post-World War II era. Yet, as Julian Bond succinctly argued, in most textbooks and the media, the popular understanding of that movement is reduced to: “Rosa sat down, Martin stood up, and the white kids came down and saved the day.”

Participate in “Scholarship and Performance: Teaching Shakespeare’s Plays.”

Would you like to spend two weeks exploring NYC and uncovering the nuances and truths of Shakespeare? In this Institute, you will have the opportunity to work with Shakespeare Scholars Julie Crawford and Mario DiGangi, as well as Teaching Artists Krista Apple and Claudia Zelavansky to renew your understanding of some of Shakespeare’s greatest plays.

A Summer Seminar on American Communism

Why should teachers care about the history of the Communist Party in the United States?

Although it never enlisted more than 100,000 members, the Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) played an outsized role in American life in the 20th century.

Martin Luther: A Conversation Part II

Craig Harline, professor of history at Brigham Young University, received an NEH Public Scholar grant to write about Martin Luther between the years 1517 and 1522. His book, A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation, was published by Oxford University Press in October 2017.

Martin Luther: A Conversation Part I

Craig Harline, professor of history at Brigham Young University, received an NEH Public Scholar grant to write about Martin Luther between the years 1517 and 1522. His book, A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation, was published by Oxford University Press in October 2017.

Frankenreads: A Global Project to Read “Frankenstein” Aloud on Halloween Day, 2018

Next year, 2018, marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). The Keats-Shelley Association of America, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is encouraging teachers, artists, authors, and actors around the world to celebrate this remarkably influential work by holding live group readings and other events on or before Halloween Day, Wednesday, October 31st, 2018.

Some Preliminary Thoughts on Contemporary Poetry

Contemporary American poetry may pose problems for high school students who have just recently tried to come to terms with its seeming opaqueness. Many poets who arrived on the scene after Robert Frost (in fact, Frost himself was a deceptively accessible poet) have earned or have had imposed on them a reputation for being willfully difficult, at the expense of readability.

Five Questions with Shelley NiTuama

This post was written by Shelley NiTuama, a Literature and Language Specialist at the National Endowment for the Humanities currently on detail to Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress.