Closer Readings

406 Result(s)
A Summer Seminar on American Communism

Why should teachers care about the history of the Communist Party in the United States?

Although it never enlisted more than 100,000 members, the Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) played an outsized role in American life in the 20th century.

Martin Luther: A Conversation Part II

Craig Harline, professor of history at Brigham Young University, received an NEH Public Scholar grant to write about Martin Luther between the years 1517 and 1522. His book, A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation, was published by Oxford University Press in October 2017.

Martin Luther: A Conversation Part I

Craig Harline, professor of history at Brigham Young University, received an NEH Public Scholar grant to write about Martin Luther between the years 1517 and 1522. His book, A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation, was published by Oxford University Press in October 2017.

Frankenreads: A Global Project to Read “Frankenstein” Aloud on Halloween Day, 2018

Next year, 2018, marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). The Keats-Shelley Association of America, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, is encouraging teachers, artists, authors, and actors around the world to celebrate this remarkably influential work by holding live group readings and other events on or before Halloween Day, Wednesday, October 31st, 2018.

Some Preliminary Thoughts on Contemporary Poetry

Contemporary American poetry may pose problems for high school students who have just recently tried to come to terms with its seeming opaqueness. Many poets who arrived on the scene after Robert Frost (in fact, Frost himself was a deceptively accessible poet) have earned or have had imposed on them a reputation for being willfully difficult, at the expense of readability.

Five Questions with Shelley NiTuama

This post was written by Shelley NiTuama, a Literature and Language Specialist at the National Endowment for the Humanities currently on detail to Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress.

Celebrating the Freedom to Read! Banned Books Week: Sep 24–30, 2017

Yes, books are dangerous. They should be dangerousthey contain ideas.” —Pete Hautman

Founded in 1982, Banned Books Week is sponsored by a coalition of national organizations devoted to freedom of speech, such as the American Library Association, and it is endorsed by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

National History Day Resources: Conflict and Compromise in History

Tess Porter is an Education Support Specialist, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

We wanted to let you know about some great new resources available for National History Day to help your students investigate this year’s theme: Conflict and Compromise in History.

Cultivating Hope through “Esperanza Rising”

I am poor, but I am rich. I have my children, I have a garden with roses, and I have my faith and the memories of those who have gone before me. What more is there? ―Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza Rising is a story filled with dichotomies—wealth and poverty, rose gardens and hard labor, faith and doubt, memory and thinking ahead.