Websites

The following websites have been approved for use in the classroom by EDSITEment. Browse websites by subject area.

Call for Website Nominations

We’re always looking to expand our suite of recommended websites. If you would like to submit a website, please review our website nomination guidelines first.

Foreign Language
<a href="/websites/cuentos-y-leyendas-ilustrados-por-ninos">Cuentos y Leyendas Ilustrados por Niños</a>

Cuentos y Leyendas Ilustrados por Niños

From the Ministerio de Educación de España, Instituto de Tecnologías Educativas, a highly interactive site using children’s stories and illustrations to teach vocabulary, grammar, and arithmetic. Beginning through intermediate younger students.

Art & Culture
<a href="/websites/cultures-independence-perspectives-independence-hall-and-meaning-freedom">Cultures of Independence:  Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom</a>

Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom

Teacher developed lessons and videos from the 2015 NEH workshop offered by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on Independence Hall and its ongoing role in creating a national and civil life.

Foreign Language

DanteWorlds

A richly visual site providing compelling images, both new graphics and classic artwork, to supplement a classroom reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Includes character studies.

Foreign Language

Dartmouth Dante Project

A searchable full-text database containing more than seventy commentaries on Dante's Divine Comedy -- the Commedia.

History & Social Studies

Democracy Web

Democracy Web is composed of an interactive world map and an online study guide for use by teachers, professors, and their upper secondary- and lower college-level students.

History & Social Studies
<a href="/websites/demos-classical-athenian-democracy">Demos: Classical Athenian Democracy</a>

Demos: Classical Athenian Democracy

Dēmos is a digital encyclopedia of classical Athenian democracy that will be useful to a wide audience. The aim is to describe the history, institutions, and people of democratic Athens in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, to publish the efforts of scholars to answer questions about Athenian democracy, and to invite you, our audience, to explore, discover, and judge for yourselves. The earliest work on Dēmos was supported by grants from Furman University and the NEH.