W.E.B. Du Bois & The Crisis

When W. E. B. Du Bois founded The Crisis in 1910, as the house magazine of the fledgling NAACP, he created what is arguably the most widely read and influential periodical about race and social injustice in U.S. history. Written for educated African-American readers, the magazine reached a truly national audience within nine years, when its circulation peaked at about 100,000. In the twelve years that will be covered by the MJP edition (from 1910 to 1922), The Crisis addressed most every facet of life for blacks in America, devoting special issues to such topics as women's suffrage, education, children, labor, homes, vacations, and the war. From the start, the magazine actively promoted the arts as well, and is deservedly recognized as an important crucible for the Harlem Renaissance.