Blogs tagged "slavery"

Ten Ways to Teach the U.S. Constitution

Preamble to the Constitution
September 17 is officially Constitution Day (celebrated on Monday, September 18 this year). Since 2005, every U.S. educational institution that receives federal funds is required to teach about the United States Constitution. The original Constitution, signed by the members of the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787, is the oldest working constitution in the world.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Declaration of Independence as the Foundational Document in American History

“The Declaration Committee,” 1876 lithograph print.
In recent years, as primary sources become more central to teaching American history, students have been asked to analyze these documents for their historical and literary significance. Among the most important American documents, most teachers would include the Declaration of Independence along with the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Celebrate African American History Month

The plaque in front of August Wilson’s childhood home
This month, in honor of African American History, we offer several new and classic suggestions for teachers looking to incorporate the best open-source—i.e., free—digital humanities resources on history and literature into their classrooms. These resources, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, bridge the gap between the expanding academic scholarship of the black experience and the need for this history to be more widely taught at the K–12 level.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Summer 2017 Professional Development for K-12 Educators in the Humanities

Participants in “The Most Southern Place on Earth” 2016 Landmarks workshop
Each year, the National Endowment for the Humanities offers tuition-free opportunities for school teachers to study a variety of humanities subjects such as architecture, history, literature, music and philosophy with some of the finest scholars and teachers in America. Topics range from African Americans in the Making of New England to Women Making Change at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Stipends of $600-$3,300 help cover expenses for these one- to four-week programs.For information and application instructions, please visit the websites for individual projects.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings