Blogs tagged "rhetoric"

The Declaration of Independence as the Foundational Document in American History

“The Declaration Committee,” 1876 lithograph print.
In recent years, as primary sources become more central to teaching American history, students have been asked to analyze these documents for their historical and literary significance. Among the most important American documents, most teachers would include the Declaration of Independence along with the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Engaging with Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson’s study in his home in Concord Museum, Concord, Massachusett
This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it.—Ralph Waldo Emerson, The American Scholar speechRalph Waldo Emerson is an exemplary author whose essays may be used to fulfill the ELA informational texts requirement for the Common Core. Here are some ways teachers can engage 21st-century students with Emerson’s thinking and rhetoric.Read More »

150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address: “A Few Well Chosen Remarks”

Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address
When Abraham Lincoln was invited in the fall of 1863 to speak at the dedication of a national cemetery on the site of a pivotal Union victory at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, it was not to give the main speech. That oration was delivered by Edward Everett, a Massachusetts statesman, vice-presidential candidate of the Constitutional Union Party in 1860, and the most famous orator of his day. Everett spoke to the crowd of 15,000 without notes for over two hours, giving an example of the kind of ornate, learned, and transcendentalist rhetoric that was expected at such ceremonies.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Emerson for the Classroom

Emersons "Old Manse" in Concord, MA
"Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind."—Ralph Waldo EmersonRead More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Declaration of Independence as a foundational document

"The Declaration Committee," 1876 lithograph print
One of the more thought provoking of the CCSS ELA standards, and yet the one that may give ELA teachers some anxiety is:CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.9: Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings