Blogs tagged "new england"

Walking the line in spring with Robert Frost: “Mending Wall”

Photograph of a low stone wall on farmland in Derry, N.H
“My poems—I should suppose everybody's poems—are all set to trip the reader head foremost into the boundless. Ever since infancy I have had the habit of leaving my blocks carts chairs and such like ordinaries where people would be pretty sure to fall forward over them in the dark. Forward, you understand, and in the dark. I may leave my toys in the wrong place and so in vain. It is my intention we are speaking of—my innate mischievousness.” —Robert FrostRead More »
Categories Closer Readings

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”

Winter Fairyland Parts of these woods
“Throughout the poem—brief in actual time, but with the deceptive length of dream—we are being drawn into silence and sleep, yet always with the slightest contrary pull of having to go on.” —Reuben A. Brower, The Poetry of Robert Frost: Constellations of Intention                                          Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Pilgrims are Coming! The Puritans are Coming!

Poster from American Experience: The Pilgrims
On Tuesday, November 24, and again on Thanksgiving night, the long-running PBS series American Experience will broadcast The Pilgrims.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Spying for “A White Heron”

Whatever treasures were lost to her, woodlands and summer−time, remember! Bring your gifts and graces and tell your secrets to this lonely country child.—“A White Heron”June is the perfect month to discover “A White Heron” by Sarah Orne Jewett. Set in in rural Maine at the end of the nineteenth century, this short story, a seamless example of a local color narrative, is also a universal tale of female coming-of-age that transcends place and time.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Participate in “Native Americans of New England: A Historical Overview”

NEH Summer Scholars at Mohegan Tribal offices
As every teacher knows, history is fraught with clichés. One is that history is always written by the victors. That may have been true for most of the 19th and 20th centuries. However, recent developments in the historical profession have turned this cliché upside down, and nowhere is this more the case than in Native American Studies.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings