Blogs tagged "declaration of independence"

Celebrate the Bicentennial of Frederick Douglass this year

Portrait of Frederick Douglass against fireworks background
On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave his famous speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” to the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society in Rochester, New York. In this blistering address, considered one of the most significant works of oratory of the 19th century, Douglass referred pointedly to the distance between the lofty ideals of the Declaration of Independence and the reality of American slaveholding and exposed the hypocrisy of celebrating independence when millions of Americans remained in bondage.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Declaration of Independence as the Foundational Document in American History

“The Declaration Committee,” 1876 lithograph print.
In recent years, as primary sources become more central to teaching American history, students have been asked to analyze these documents for their historical and literary significance. Among the most important American documents, most teachers would include the Declaration of Independence along with the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

What Makes the Declaration Foundational?

One of the more thought provoking of the Common Core State Standards, and at the same time, one that may give ELA teachers some anxiety is:Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

A Truly “Star-Spangled” Month

NEH Summer Scholars at Ft. Henry Maryland
Susan Key is the Star Spangled Music Foundation Executive DirectorRead More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Declaration of Independence as a foundational document

"The Declaration Committee," 1876 lithograph print
One of the more thought provoking of the CCSS ELA standards, and yet the one that may give ELA teachers some anxiety is:CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.9: Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings