Blogs tagged "civil rights"

The Selma to Montgomery March and Passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965

Marchers carrying banner "We march with Selma!" on street in Harlem, New York
Students love a good fight. From the Boston Tea Party to the Vietnam War, students’ genuine interest in historical protests is as recurrent a theme in the classroom as uprisings and demonstrations are in human history. Teachers sometimes wonder why the fight for rights and for a redress of grievances—more than other historical themes—regularly awakens their students to the lessons of history and gets them truly engaged in content.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

10 Outstanding Historical Documentaries on Civil Rights

Freedom Riders bus burning
Now more than ever, teachers are looking to find excellent African American primary sources in all media. Riveting historical films from the long history of slavery, race and the struggle for civil rights, such as 12 Years a Slave and Selma, are pretty much the first choice for those who want to engage students.Read More »
Categories Heritage Months

NEH’s Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

"Selma to Montgomery Marches"
Five state-of-the-art documentary films are the centerpiece of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Web project, Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

What I Learned Teaching APUSH 2014-2015 Part Two

Waylon Lewallen is an APUSH teacher at Spring Hill High School, Hope, Arkansas.
Part Two Last week I discussed my experiences retooling the APUSH course to meet the new mandates set by the College Board. This week, I’ll talk about my experience as a table leader at the APUSH reading.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

What I Learned Teaching APUSH 2014–2015 Part One

Waylon Lewallen is an APUSH teacher at Spring Hill High School, Hope, Arkansas.
As teachers around the nation begin their summer filled with professional and staff development, school improvement meetings, curriculum planning, as well as anxiously awaiting the results of the year’s standardized tests, one item (for many) tends to take precedent: How did my students fare on the Advanced Placement tests? For those of us who teach Advanced Placement United States History (APUSH), the doubts and worries go much deeper than test scores. It is: “Did I teach my students correctly according to the new APUSH redesign?”“Are we preparing correctly?”Read More »
Categories Closer Readings