Postings by Julia Nguyen

Celebrate the Bicentennial of Frederick Douglass this year

Portrait of Frederick Douglass against fireworks background
On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave his famous speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” to the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society in Rochester, New York. In this blistering address, considered one of the most significant works of oratory of the 19th century, Douglass referred pointedly to the distance between the lofty ideals of the Declaration of Independence and the reality of American slaveholding and exposed the hypocrisy of celebrating independence when millions of Americans remained in bondage.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month with EDSITEment

Miss April Lou, PS 1, Manhattan, with six Chinese children.
May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month, and EDSITEment resources can deepen your students’ understanding of Asian American and Pacific Islander history and culture.Read More »
Categories Heritage Months

Lincoln’s Enduring Legacy

Hermann Faber, Deathbed scene with man holding Lincoln, 1865
Abraham Lincoln’s assassinationOn April 14 we commemorate the death of Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865). The years in which Lincoln served as president, 1861–1865, were among the most momentous in America’s history. A month after his election, South Carolina seceded from the Union, triggering a four-year conflict that would leave nearly a million Americans dead or wounded, four million slaves free, and a nation changed forever.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Study of African American History This Summer

Portrait of Frederick Douglass
We celebrate Black History Month in February, but learning can continue all year long. Check out these NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes for School Teachers dealing with African American history and culture. All programs are free and include stipends to help cover travel and living expenses.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

A Very Brief Introduction to the Modern World through Eighteen Maps

Early French map of New Orleans
By Julia Nguyen, Senior Program Officer, Division of Education Programs, National Endowment for the Humanities.Maps help us orient ourselves in a landscape and interpret the world around us. At a time when many of us frequently access digital maps on phones or in cars, there is still value in deep reading of historical maps first produced on paper.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings