August 11

Andrew Carnegie dies

August 11, 1919

Related Lessons

  • The Industrial Age in America: Robber Barons and Captains of Industry
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Industrial Age in America: Robber Barons and Captains of Industry

    How shall we judge the contributions to American society of the great financiers and industrialists at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries? In this lesson, students explore a variety of primary historical sources to uncover some of the less honorable deeds as well as the shrewd business moves and highly charitable acts of the great industrialists and financiers, men such as Andrew Carnegie, J. Pierpont Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

  • The Industrial Age in America: Sweatshops, Steel Mills, and Factories
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Industrial Age in America: Sweatshops, Steel Mills, and Factories

    About a century has passed since the events at the center of this lesson-the Haymarket Affair, the Homestead Strike, and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire. In this lesson, students use primary historical sources to explore some of the questions raised by these events, questions that continue to be relevant in debates about American society: Where do we draw the line between acceptable business practices and unacceptable working conditions? Can an industrial-and indeed a post-industrial-economy succeed without taking advantage of those who do the work?

Author of “Roots” and co-author of “Autobiography of Malcom X,” Alex Haley, born

August 11, 1921

Related Lessons

  • Families in Bondage
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Families in Bondage

    Learn how slavery shattered family life through the pre-Civil War letters of those whose loved ones were taken away or left behind.

  • Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Malcolm X argued that America was too racist in its institutions and people to offer hope to blacks. In contrast with Malcolm X's black separatism, Martin Luther King, Jr. offered what he considered "the more excellent way of love and nonviolent protest" as a means of building an integrated community of blacks and whites in America. This lesson will contrast the respective aims and means of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. to evaluate the possibilities for black American progress in the 1960s.