"Heritage Months" Blog Posts

Unfinished Business and Enduring Legacies

Pauli Murray College courtyard, Yale
Leslie Abbatiello, Project Director/John Gustafson, Project Coordinator.In social studies classrooms and movie theaters alike, the civil rights movement appears to fit neatly into a short timeframe, from “Montgomery to Memphis.” It begins with Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, followed by victories during the Montgomery Bus Boycotts in 1955 and the March on Washington in 1963, and ends decisively with the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968.Read More »

Commemorate the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial with these NEH resources

Frederick Douglass as a young man
February is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Frederick Douglass, an extraordinary American orator and statesman. Born into slavery, he escaped and joined the abolitionist movement, working as a writer, publisher, orator, and Underground Railroad conductor. During the Civil War he worked actively for the enlistment of black men in the Union Army and for emancipation. In the Reconstruction era and after, he continued his fight for equal rights for African Americans and for women.Read More »

Celebrating Chinese New Year: Welcome the Year of the Dog!

Izumiya Tomotada - Netsuke in the Form of a Dog
February 16 marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year—the most important festival in this cultural tradition as well as the most joyous. Lasting for fifteen days, it ushers in a period of family celebration and community festivities. We are entering the Year of the Dog, the eleventh of twelve signs in the Chinese zodiac.Read More »

Celebrating Hispanic Culture through Poetry and Fiction

Wintering Monarch butterflies
September 15–October 15 marks Hispanic Heritage Month, a time when the nation is called to celebrate the cultures of those Americans whose roots lead back to countries in Central and South America, the Caribbean Islands, Mexico, and Spain.Read More »

Five Essential Resources for Teaching Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt and United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Lake
“One of the things people don’t understand about Eleanor Roosevelt, because she seemed so ladylike, and she has that aristocratic voice and that manner: she was tough as nails. In fact she was one of the best politicians of the 20th century.” — Geoffrey Ward, Eleanor RooseveltEleanor Roosevelt was a key figure in some of the most important social reform movements of the twentieth century, including the Progressive movement, the New Deal, the Women's Movement, the struggle for racial justice, and the founding of the United Nations.Read More »