February 2018 Blog Posts

Unfinished Business and Enduring Legacies

Pauli Murray College courtyard, Yale
Leslie Abbatiello, Project Director/John Gustafson, Project Coordinator.In social studies classrooms and movie theaters alike, the civil rights movement appears to fit neatly into a short timeframe, from “Montgomery to Memphis.” It begins with Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, followed by victories during the Montgomery Bus Boycotts in 1955 and the March on Washington in 1963, and ends decisively with the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968.Read More »
Categories Heritage Months

Commemorate the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial with these NEH resources

Frederick Douglass as a young man
February is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Frederick Douglass, an extraordinary American orator and statesman. Born into slavery, he escaped and joined the abolitionist movement, working as a writer, publisher, orator, and Underground Railroad conductor. During the Civil War he worked actively for the enlistment of black men in the Union Army and for emancipation. In the Reconstruction era and after, he continued his fight for equal rights for African Americans and for women.Read More »
Categories Heritage Months

Teaching Classic Novels through Popular Adaptations: An Interview

Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis and Sean Connors
Lissette Lopez Szwydky-Davis* and Sean Connors** received an NEH grant for their Summer Institute for K-12 educators, “Remaking Monsters and Heroines: Adapting Classic Literature for Contemporary Audiences.” What follows is a conversation between EDSITEment and Dr. Szwydyky-Davis and Dr. Connors about adapting literature for the classroom.Teachers are using popular adaptations to teach novels. Are there some really good ways of doing this?  And are there some approaches to avoid?Read More »
Categories Closer Readings