Closer Readings +

Remembering the First Ladies

First ladies sit together at the National Garden Gala
“...In the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I would desire you would Remember the Ladies. . . . Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. . . . If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to foment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.” —Abigail AdamsRead More »
Categories Closer Readings

Celebrate African American History Month

The plaque in front of August Wilson’s childhood home
This month, in honor of African American History, we offer several new and classic suggestions for teachers looking to incorporate the best open-source—i.e., free—digital humanities resources on history and literature into their classrooms. These resources, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, bridge the gap between the expanding academic scholarship of the black experience and the need for this history to be more widely taught at the K–12 level.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Questing after the American Dream: “A Raisin in the Sun”

Photo of a scene from the play A Raisin in the Sun 1959
“Seems like God don't see fit to give the black man nothing but dreams—but He did give us children to make them dreams seem worthwhile.” —A Raisin in the Sun  Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

World War I and American Art: Part Two

“Flower of Death” (1919)
Last time, I began to survey how American artists viewed the Great War (1914–1918). This NEH-supported exhibition, World War I and American Art, has uncovered forgotten works that could help teachers illustrate and illuminate the course of the war, the political opinions pro and con, and the enormous human toll it had on the nation and the world.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Celebrating Chinese New Year: Welcome the Year of the Rooster!

Rooster statue, Kowloon Walled City Park
January 27 marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year—the most important festival in this cultural tradition as well as the most joyous. Lasting for fifteen days, it ushers in a period of family celebration and community festivities. We are entering the Year of the Rooster.Read More »
Categories Heritage Months