Websites

The following websites have been approved for use in the classroom by EDSITEment. Browse websites by subject area.

Call for Website Nominations

We’re always looking to expand our suite of recommended websites. If you would like to submit a website, please review our website nomination guidelines first.

History & Social Studies

Discovering Lewis and Clark

A detailed synopsis of the expedition by historian Harry Fritz is enhanced by photographs, interactive maps, audio files, and illustrations from the expedition journals.

Literature & Language Arts
<a href="/websites/discovering-literature-shakespeare">Discovering Literature: Shakespeare</a>

Discovering Literature: Shakespeare

A rich online resource from the British Library exploring Shakespeare in multiple dimensions. Separate sections are devoted to his works; a collection of primary source objects, some in the public domain; and teaching resources relating to Shakespearean works.

Art & Culture

Do History

The site centers upon the historical work surrounding the diary of Martha Ballard, an 18th-century midwife. The core of the site is Martha's actual diary, which can be browsed or searched online, but the site also includes a large archive of primary sources about Martha and colonial America.

Art & Culture

Documenting the American South

Growing collection of primary materials documenting the cultural history of the American South from the viewpoint of Southerners.

Art & Culture
<a href="/websites/dsokids-dallas-symphony-orchestra">DSOKids, Dallas Symphony Orchestra</a>

DSOKids, Dallas Symphony Orchestra

Bring a virtual music room to your class! Engage in musical games, check out Listen and Learn, access the lesson database, and more…

History & Social Studies
<a href="/websites/e-pluribus-unum">E Pluribus Unum</a>

E Pluribus Unum

The E Pluribus Unum Project is designed for use by students, teachers, and other researchers who wish to examine the attempt to make "one from many" in three critical decades of American life: the 1770s, the 1850s, and the 1920s.