• Lesson 2: What's In A Name? British Surnames Derived from Places

    Last names as we know them now originated

    Over half of all English surnames used today are derived from the names of places where people lived. This type is known as a locative surname. For example, a man called John who lived near the marsh, might be known as John Marsh. John who lived in the dell was called John Dell. Other examples are John Brook, John Lake, and John Rivers.

  • The Path of the Black Death

    The Black Plague cut a huge swath of devastation through the heart of 14th  century Europe.

    The Black Death cut a path—both literal and figurative—through the middle of the 14th century. In this lesson, students analyze maps, firsthand accounts, and archival documents to trace the path and aftermath of the Black Death.

  • Witnesses to Joan of Arc and The Hundred Years' War

    Statue of Joan of Arc in Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.

    Joan of Arc is likely one of France's most famous historical figures, and has been mythologized in popular lore, literature, and film. She is also an exceptionally well-documented historical figure. Through such firsthand accounts students can trace Joan's history from childhood, through her death, and on to her nullification trial.

  • Magna Carta: Cornerstone of the U.S. Constitution

    King John of England (right) and an English baron agreeing to Magna Carta

    Magna Carta served to lay the foundation for the evolution of parliamentary government and subsequent declarations of rights in Great Britain and the United States. In attempting to establish checks on the king's powers, this document asserted the right of "due process" of law.