• Lesson 2: The Campaign of 1840: The Candidates

    John Tyler, 10th President of the United States (1841–1845)

    Many accounts portray Harrison's image as manufactured and Van Buren's image also open to criticism and ridicule. This lesson offers students the opportunity to reflect on the nature of the candidates in 1840. Though intended for the teacher, all or part of the following background information may be useful for some students.

  • Lesson 3: The Election Is in the House: Was There a Corrupt Bargain?

    Henry Clay did not win the 1824 presidential election

    Students examine John Quincy Adams' win of the 1824 election.

  • Lesson 2: The Election Is in the House: 1824: The Candidates and the Issues

    William H. Crawford was one of four candidates for President in 1824.

    All of the major candidates for president in the 1824 election claimed allegiance to the same party, the Democratic-Republicans. What distinguished the candidates from each other? What were the important issues in the campaign of 1824?

  • Lesson 1: The Campaign of 1840: The Whigs, the Democrats, and the Issues

    William Henry Harrison ran against Van Buren in 1840 as a Whig.

    Many accounts portray the campaign of 1840 as almost exclusively image-based. This lesson offers students the opportunity to reflect on the nature of the campaign. Though intended for the teacher, all or part of the following background information may be useful for some students.

  • Lesson 3: James Madison: Raising an Army: Balancing the Power of the States and the Federal Government

    James Madison.

    Not everyone in the U.S. supported the War of 1812. What events during Madison's presidency raised constitutional questions? What were the constitutional issues? Where did Madison stand?

  • Lesson 4: James Madison: Internal Improvements Balancing Act: Federal/State, Executive/Legislative

    James Madison.

    There was general agreement at the beginning of the 19th century that the U.S. would greatly benefit from some internal improvements of a national nature, such as a nationwide network of roads and canals. But how should the funds for such projects be raised? Who should be in control of the projects—that is, who should administer them?

  • Lesson 1: The Election Is in the House: The Denouement

    Andrew Jackson was one of four presidential candidates in 1824.

    This lesson will help students develop a better understanding of the election of 1824 and its significance.

  • Lesson 1: James Madison: Madison Was There

    James Madison.

    Why is James Madison such an important figure? Why is he known as the "Father of the Constitution"? How involved was James Madison in the most important events in America from 1775 to 1817? The answers to these questions provide context for understanding the importance of James Madison's opinions on constitutional issues.

  • Lesson 2: James Madison: The Second National Bank—Powers Not Specified in the Constitution

    James Madison.

    In this lesson, students examine the First and Second National Banks and whether or not such a bank's powers are constitutional or unconstitutional.

  • Lesson 2: The First American Party System: A Documentary Timeline of Important Events (1787–1800)

    Thomas Jefferson, Democratic-Republican, and Alexander Hamilton, Federalist 2

    In this lesson, students examine the critical factors leading to the development of the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans and look at the timeline of key events and issues caused the differences in opinion.