PBS: Napoleon

The site includes an episode guide, a handful of interactive features such as an interactive simulation of the Battle of Waterloo, a closed bulletin board, video clips, and a timeline of Napoleon's life. Four online classroom guides are designed for middle and high school classrooms.

Anne Frank seated at desk, writing

Anne Frank House

The Anne Frank House in the center of Amsterdam was the hiding place where Anne Frank wrote her famous diary during World War Two. Excellent Holocaust and World War Two resource.

  • Lesson 4: The Monroe Doctrine: Whose Doctrine Was It?

    John Quincy Adams played a crucial role in formulating the Monroe Doctrine when  he was Monroe's Secretary of State.

    In what ways did John Quincy Adams and Thomas Jefferson contribute to the formulation of the Monroe Doctrine?

  • Lesson 1: The Monroe Doctrine: U.S. Foreign Affairs (circa 1782–1823) and James Monroe

    Portrait of James Monroe, fifth President of the United States, by Gilbert  Stuart.

    What was the Monroe Doctrine? What principles of foreign policy did this Doctrine establish? What were the significant events in U.S. diplomacy before 1823? What diplomatic roles had James Monroe played before he became president? Here, a careful examination of the document anticipates what is to come.

  • Lesson 3: British Surnames Derived from Occupations or Professions

    Last names as we know them

    Another common type of medieval byname derived from how a man spent his time. Every farming village had a blacksmith to forge iron tools, a miller to grind wheat, a carpenter to craft furniture, and many other specialists.

  • Lesson 1: From the President's Lips: The Concerns that Led to the Sedition (and Alien) Act

    John Adams.

    What conditions provided the impetus for the Sedition Act? Partisan animosity was strong during Adams's presidency. The first two political parties in the U.S. were in their infancy—the Federalists, to which the majority of members of Congress belonged, and the Democratic-Republicans, led by former vice-president Thomas Jefferson and four-term Congressman James Madison, who had left the House in 1796.

  • Sophocles' Antigone: Ancient Greek Theatre, Live From Antiquity!

    Antiquity thumb

    Return to ancient Athens for the world premier of Antigone, a play by Sophocles.

  • In Old Pompeii

    Vesuvius from Portici, c. 1774–1776. Joseph Wright (British,  1734–1797), oil on canvas, 101 x 127 cm.

    A virtual field trip to the ruins of Pompeii. In this lesson, students learn about everyday life, art and culture in ancient Roman times, then display their knowledge by creating a travelogue to attract visitors to the site. They can also write an account of their field trip modeled on a description of Pompeii written by Mark Twain. 

  • The Path of the Black Death

    The Black Plague cut a huge swath of devastation through the heart of 14th  century Europe.

    The Black Death cut a path—both literal and figurative—through the middle of the 14th century. In this lesson, students analyze maps, firsthand accounts, and archival documents to trace the path and aftermath of the Black Death.

  • Lesson 2: How to Win a World War

    "General Bernard L. Montgomery watches his tanks move up." North Africa,  November 1942.

    For most of 1942, the Grand Alliance between the U.S., Britain, and the Soviet Union was on the defensive. Whether it could hold together, or whether the Soviet Union would even remain in the conflict, was uncertain. This lesson plan examines the tensions and the sources of ultimate cohesion within the Grand Alliance during the period when eventual victory seemed uncertain.