Student Resources

Student resources are interactive activities collected from around the Web. They can be used to support related lesson plans or as standalone activities in the classroom. Browse our library of student resources by grade level or subject area below.

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Art & Culture

What's in a Name: Characteristic and Patronymic Names -- Game Three

For EDSITEment Lesson: How Did Surnames Come to Be? Match each surname to its meaning. A correct answer will win you two stars. Continue until the chart is filled with stars.

Art & Culture

What's in a Name: Characteristic and Patronymic Names -- Second Game

For EDSITEment Lesson: How Did Surnames Come to Be? Match each surname to its meaning. A correct answer will win you two stars. Continue until the chart is filled with stars.

History & Social Studies

What's in a Name: Characteristic and Patronymic Names -- First Game

For EDSITEment Lesson: How Did Surnames Come to Be? Match each surname to its meaning. A correct answer will win you two stars. Continue until the chart is filled with stars.

History & Social Studies

Campaign of 1824: Candidates and Issues

Instructions: Using material from the lessons and the related links, fill in the information as completely as you can on each of the candidates in the presidential election of 1824.
History & Social Studies

What Made George Washington a Good Military Leader: What are the Qualities of a Good Military Leader?

  • What qualities made George Washington an effective general?
  • How were the responsibilities of the Commander-in-Chief affected by conditions during the Revolutionary War?
  • How did Washington's responses to these challenges demonstrate his ability to handle a wide range of problems?
History & Social Studies

What Made George Washington a Good Military Leader: George Washington’s Early Military Experience

The essay Life Before the Presidency on the EDSITEment-reviewed website The American President describes Washington's earliest military experiences as "disastrous." He went on to modest success—at best—before he retired in 1758. Yet, the same article states that though Washington hesitated to accept the commission as Commander-in-Chief because of "the misadventures against the French and Native Americans," he was chosen by the Continental Congress to be Commander-in-Chief because the "leadership and charisma of the tall, quiet, stately Virginian was unsurpassed."