• Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-paper"—Writing Women

    Created January 25, 2011

    Reference Shelf

    Teachers' Quick Reference Indexes

    In our continuing efforts to improve EDSITEment for its users, we have added these quick reference indexes that consolidate links to content for various teaching constituencies. More may be added as compelling needs are identified.

    Watercooler photo  Jim Crow site

    Remembering Jim Crow

    In this podcast and website, produced by American Radio Work with major funding from NEH, the system of racial segregation in the south popularly known as "Jim Crow" is remembered. For much of the 20th century, African Americans in the South were barred from the voting booth, sent to the back of the bus, and walled off from many of the rights they deserved as American citizens. Until well into the 1960s, segregation was legal.

    detail of Nate and his father from game

    Mission US: For Crown or Colony?

    Let your students fill the shoes of 14-year-old printer's apprentice Nat Wheeler as tensions mount before the Boston Massacre in Mission US, "For Crown or Colony?," an NEH-funded multimedia project featuring a free, interactive educational game set in 1770s Boston, with lesson plans, and more.

  • Tales of the Supernatural

    Created November 9, 2010
    Edgar Allen Poe.

    Examine the relationship between science and the supernatural in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the “horror stories” of Hawthorne and Poe.

  • Twelve Angry Men: Trial by Jury as a Right and as a Political Institution

    Created October 28, 2010
    Twelve Angry Men: Image Still from original movie

    The classic American drama Twelve Angry Men serves as the starting point for a discussion of the constitutional right and civic function of the trial by jury. The lesson explores the specific provisions associated with this right as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the system.

  • Why Do We Remember Revere? Paul Revere's Ride in History and Literature

    Created October 14, 2010
    Why Do We Remember Revere?

    After an overview of the events surrounding Paul Revere's famous ride, this lesson challenges students to think about the reasons for that fame.  Using both primary and secondhand accounts, students compare the account of Revere's ride in Longfellow's famous poem with actual historical events, in order to answer the question: why does Revere's ride occupy such a prominent place in the American consciousness?