American Centuries: View from New England

This website is unique in many design features that facilitate successful use by educators and students. It includes a large library of primary resources, curricula, and interactive student activities; most of them presented in age-appropriate, user-friendly formats.

Alexis De Tocqueville Tour: Exploring Democracy in America

This site—hosted by C-SPAN—is based on a tour of De Tocqueville's route through America.

Africans in America

A companion site to the PBS series tracing the struggle against slavery.

African Voices

Explore African art, history, and political and social themes through essays, timelines, images, and games.

African Studies Center

Cultural, educational, and statistical resources covering the African continent. From the University of Pennsylvania.

The Federal Procession in New York, 1788. Engraving

First Federal Congress Project

Chartered by the University Research Center affiliated with the Department of History at the George Washington University, this site has a dual mission: collecting, researching, editing and publishing the universally acclaimed Documentary History of the First Federal Congress, 1789-1791, and serving as a research center on the most important and productive Congress in U.S. history.

African-American Women Onine Archival Collections

Historical collection of letters and memoirs by African-American women in the nineteenth-century.

  • JFK, LBJ, and the Fight for Equal Opportunity in the 1960s

    Created March 2, 2010
    JFK, LBJ : President Kennedy

    This lesson provides students with an opportunity to study and analyze the innovative legislative efforts of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson in the social and economic context of the 1960s.

  • Interactive: Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

    Created February 23, 2010
  • Boycotting Baubles of Britain

    Created December 22, 2009
    Boycotting Baubles of Britain-boston tea party

    This lesson looks at the changes in British colonial policies and the American resistance through the topic of tea, clothing, and other British goods. Students analyze and interpret key historical artifacts as well as visual and textual sources that shed light on how commodities such as tea became important symbols of personal and political identity during the years leading up to the formal Declaration of Independence in 1776.