• JFK, LBJ, and the Fight for Equal Opportunity in the 1960s

    Created March 2, 2010
    JFK, LBJ : President Kennedy

    This lesson provides students with an opportunity to study and analyze the innovative legislative efforts of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson in the social and economic context of the 1960s.

  • Interactive: Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

    Created February 23, 2010
  • Boycotting Baubles of Britain

    Created December 22, 2009
    Boycotting Baubles of Britain-boston tea party

    This lesson looks at the changes in British colonial policies and the American resistance through the topic of tea, clothing, and other British goods. Students analyze and interpret key historical artifacts as well as visual and textual sources that shed light on how commodities such as tea became important symbols of personal and political identity during the years leading up to the formal Declaration of Independence in 1776.

  • Lesson 1: NAACP’s Anti-Lynching Campaign in the 1920s

    Created December 22, 2009
    Lesson 1: NAACP’s Anti-Lynching Campaign in the 1920s: Blots of shame

    This lesson focuses on the constitutional arguments for and against the enactment of federal anti-lynching legislation in the early 1920s. Students will participate in a simulation game that enacts a fictitious Senate debate of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill. As a result of completing this activity, students will gain a better understanding of the federal system, the legislative process, and the difficulties social justice advocates encountered.

  • Women's Equality: Changing Attitudes and Beliefs

    Portrait of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (seated) and Susan B. Anthony.

    Students analyze archival cartoons, posters, magazine humor, newspaper articles and poems that reflect the deeply entrenched attitudes and beliefs the early crusaders for women’s rights had to overcome.

  • Listening to History

    The Statue of Liberty

    This lesson plan is designed to help students tap oral history by conducting interviews with family members.

  • Voting Rights for Women: Pro- and Anti-Suffrage

    Suffragists voting in New York, 1917.

    Students research archival material to examine nineteenth and early twentieth century arguments for and against women's suffrage.

  • Who Were the Foremothers of Women's Equality?

    Portrait of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (seated) and Susan B. Anthony.
  • Was There an Industrial Revolution? Americans at Work Before the Civil War

    Image Courtesy of American Memory.

    In this lesson, students explore the First Industrial Revolution in early nineteenth-century America. By reading and comparing first-hand accounts of the lives of workers before the Civil War, students prepare for a series of guided role-playing activities designed to help them make an informed judgment as to whether the changes that took place in manufacturing and distribution during this period are best described as a "revolution" or as a steady evolution over time.

  • The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

    U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and French Premier Georges Clemenceau

    Was the Treaty of Versailles, which formally concluded World War I, a legitimate attempt by the victorious powers to prevent further conflict, or did it place an unfair burden on Germany? This lesson helps students respond to the question in an informed manner. Activities involve primary sources, maps, and other supporting documents related to the peace process and its reception by the German public and German politicians.