Race—Are We So Different?

Race—Are We So Different? is a project of the American Anthropological Association. A traveling exhibit and website, it looks through the eyes of history, science, and lived experience to explain differences among people and reveal the reality—and unreality—of race. The site contains a virtual tour of the exhibit, resources for middle and high school teachers, STEM resources, and a robust American history section with an interactive timeline.

World War I poster by Howard Chandler Christy (1873–1952)

Women's Empowerment in America and the World

Immerse yourself in the great contributions women have made to our history and culture.

  • Launchpad: “The Namesake,” by Willa Cather

    Created February 21, 2013
    Seventeen Moments in Soviet History banner detail

    Seventeen Moments in Soviet History

    Seventeen Moments in Soviet History contains a rich archive of texts, images, maps and audio and video materials from the Soviet era (1917–1991). The materials are arranged by year and by subject, are fully searchable, and are translated into English. Students, educators, and scholars will find materials about Soviet propaganda, politics, economics, society, crime, literature, art, dissidents and hundreds of other topics.

    galileo telescope image from website

    The Scientific Revolution: Science & Society from the Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment

    Hosted by the History Teaching Institute at Ohio State University, this page has a variety of lesson plans that educate students on how the development of science in Europe related to ongoing revolutions in politics, religion, and society. These lessons are rich in primary source readings from figures like Sir Isaac Newton, Galileo, and Johannes Kepler.

    Picturing Early America: People, Places, and Events 1770–1870

    A resource developed from NEH Summer Institutes held at Salem State University that explore early American art and culture. The website assists teachers of American history, literature, art, geography, social studies, American studies, and other fields who wish to incorporate American art into their classrooms. It includes podcasts, unit plans, and print and electronic bibliographies.

    John Singleton Copley portrait of Elizabeth Murray

    Elizabeth Murray Project

    This resource site for early American history features a constantly growing digital collection of primary sources — print and manuscript documents, as well as images — and transcribed versions of these materials from various libraries and archives. It also includes a host of K–12 teaching resources including timeline, interactive primary sources and lesson plans.

    What is Chronicling America?

    National Digital Newspaper Project

    Since 2005, the National Endowment for the Humanities has made National Digital Newspaper (NDNP) awards to enhance the study of American history. These awards enable cultural heritage institutions to join the NDNP for the purpose of selecting, digitizing, and delivering approximately 100,000 newspaper pages per award to the Library of Congress. The National Endowment for the Humanities has solicited proposals for both initial awards to new institutions as well as continuing awards to returning partners annually since 2005.

    What is Chronicling America?

    National History Day


    What is Chronicling America?

    Searching Chronicling America

    Chronicling America provides free access to millions of historic American newspaper pages. Listed at these links are topics widely covered in the American press of the time. Chronicling America will be adding more topics on a regular basis. To find out what's new, sign up for Chronicling America's weekly notification service, that highlights interesting content on the site and lets you know when new newspapers and topics are added.