• Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-paper"—Writing Women

    Front page illustration for the original serialized version of The Yellow  Wallpaper from the New England Magazine (1892).

    Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wall-paper" was written during this time of great change. This lesson plan, the second part of a two-part lesson, helps to set the historical, social, cultural, and economic context of Gilman's story.

  • African-American Soldiers in World War I: The 92nd and 93rd Divisions

    Painting of African American soldiers fighting German soldiers in World War I

    Late in 1917, the War Department created two all-black infantry divisions. The 93rd Infantry Division received unanimous praise for its performance in combat, fighting as part of France’s 4th Army. In this lesson, students combine their research in a variety of sources, including firsthand accounts, to develop a hypothesis evaluating contradictory statements about the performance of the 92nd Infantry Division in World War I.

  • Lesson 2: Thirteen Ways of Reading a Modernist Poem

    Planes, (subway) trains, automobiles and World War I

    This lesson prompts students to think about a poem’s speaker within the larger context of modernist poetry. First, students will review the role of the speaker in two poems of the Romanticism period before focusing on the differences in Wallace Stevens’ modernist “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.

  • Lesson 1: The Origins of "Wilsonianism"

    Created July 16, 2010
    Because of the First World War and its aftermath, Woodrow Wilson fashioned an  ambitious international agenda.

    The influence of President Woodrow Wilson on American foreign policy has been profound and lasting. Using a variety of primary sources, students analyze the origins of the ambitious foreign policy that came to be known as Wilsonianism and compare it with important alternative traditions in American foreign policy.

  • Lesson 1: The Growth of U.S.–Japanese Hostility, 1915–1932

    Japanese forces enter Mukden, China, September 18, 1931, as part of Japan's  Manchurian campaign against China.

    The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor had its origins in a growing antagonism between the United States and Japan that first developed during World War I. Using contemporary documents, students in this lesson will explore the rise of animosity between the United States and Japan.

  • Lesson 3: United States Entry into World War I: A Documentary Chronology of World War I

    United States Entry into World War I: Portrait of Woodrow Wilson

    In this lesson of the curriculum unit, students reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.

  • Lesson 3: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: Five Camps: From Voices of Consent to Voices of Dissent

    Woodrow Wilson for League of Nations

    American foreign resonates with the debate over U.S. entry into the League of Nations-collective security versus national sovereignty, idealism versus pragmatism, the responsibilities of powerful nations, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals, the idea of America. Understanding the debate over the League and the consequences of its failure provides insight into international affairs in the years since the Great War and beyond. In this lesson, students read the words and listen to the voices of some central participants in the debate over the League of Nations.

  • African-American Soldiers After World War I: Had Race Relations Changed?

    Photograph showing six people, including Charles Young

    In this lesson, students view archival photographs, combine their efforts to comb through a database of more than 2,000 archival newspaper accounts about race relations in the United States, and read newspaper articles written from different points of view about post-war riots in Chicago.

  • Lesson 3: Navigating Modernism with J. Alfred Prufrock

    Planes, (subway) trains, automobiles and World War I

    In this lesson, students will explore the role of the individual in the modern world by closely reading and analyzing T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.”

  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-paper"—The "New Woman"

    "Wash Day" satirizes the suffrage movement at the turn-of-the-century.

    Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wall-paper" was written during this time of great change. This lesson plan, the first part of a two-part lesson, helps to set the historical, social, cultural, and economic context of Gilman's story.