Lincoln's first inaugural address

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Repeats every year until Sun Mar 04 2035 .
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March 4, 1861
Benny Carter Jazz Appreciation Month poster, 2016

Jazz Appreciation Month 2016: Benny Carter and Democracy

Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM) was created by the National Museum of American History in 2002 to celebrate the extraordinary heritage and history of jazz. Each year the museum picks a major musician to commemorate.

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    Created February 12, 2016
    Created Equal logo

    "Created Equal"

    NEH initiative of five outstanding films on the long civil rights movement .  The website contains five complete films, background essays, and a teachers' resource section with film clips, primary source documents, and lesson plans.

    "AVMM" logo AVMM letter across music manuscript backdrop

    American Vernacular Music Manuscripts

    NEH-funded American Vernacular Music Manuscripts, ca. 1730-1910: Digital Collections from the American Antiquarian Society and the Center for Popular Music" offers handwritten music manuscripts by common Americans, containing primary and direct evidence of their musical preferences during a particular time and in a particular place.

  • William Henry Singleton’s Resistance to Slavery: Overt and Covert

    Created June 17, 2015
    Singleton Lesson 1 image

    In this lesson, students will learn that enslaved people resisted their captivity constantly. Because they were living under the domination of their masters, slaves knew that direct, outright, overt resistance—such as talking back, hitting their master or running away––could result in being whipped, sold away from their families and friends, or even killed.