• On the Home Front

    Created October 3, 2010
    On the Home Front: We Can Do It!

    Learning about World War II American efforts helps students gain some perspective regarding the U.S. response to the conflict generated by the September 11th terrorist attacks.

  • Having Fun in the 19th Century: Fall River Line

    Created September 30, 2010

    Launchpad: Pearl S. Buck

    Pearl S. Buck’s “On Discovering America”

    Activity 1 | Activity 2 | Activity 3

  • The Battle Over Reconstruction: Southern Recovery

    Created July 23, 2010
  • An Early Threat of Secession: The Missouri Compromise, 1820–1821

    Created July 18, 2010
  • Building Suburbia: Highways and Housing in Postwar America

    Created June 10, 2010
    Building Suburbia: Diebenkorn's City Scape

    This lesson highlights the changing relationship between the city center and the suburb in the postwar decades, especially in the 1950s. Students will look at the legislation leading up to and including the Federal Highway Act of 1956. They will also examine documents about the history of Levittown, the most famous and most important of the postwar suburban planned developments.

  • Lesson 4: Abraham Lincoln, the 1860 Election, and the Future of the American Union and Slavery

    Created July 19, 2010
    Abraham Lincoln at the time of his historic debates with Stephen A. Douglas.

    This lesson plan will explore Abraham Lincoln's rise to political prominence during the debate over the future of American slavery. Lincoln's anti-slavery politics will be contrasted with the abolitionism of William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass and the "popular sovereignty" concept of U.S. Senator Stephen A. Douglas.

  • Lesson 2: Slavery's Opponents and Defenders

    Idyllic cartoon of slaves thanking their master for taking care of them

    This lesson plan will explore the wide-ranging debate over American slavery by presenting the lives of its leading opponents and defenders and the views they held about America's "peculiar institution."

  • Was There an Industrial Revolution? New Workplace, New Technology, New Consumers

    Image Courtesy of American Memory.

    In this lesson, students explore the First Industrial Revolution in early nineteenth-century America. Through simulation activities and the examination of primary historical materials, students learn how changes in the workplace and less expensive goods led to the transformation of American life.