For Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

Literature of the Civil War

Read and discuss some of the great American writers and their work in the mid-19th century. This feature explores the themes of slavery, the role of women, and the experience of war.

From Norman Rockwell's "Freedom of Speech"

The First Amendment

This page from EDSITEment features resources relating to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution and presents information about the history and application of the amendment.

Portrait of Miguel de Cervantes

Six Hispanic Literary Giants

Explore the great Hispanic poets, from 1600 to present.

A portrait of young Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson: An American Poet for All Seasons

EDSITEment celebrates the life and work of American poet Emily Dickinson, including her talents as baker and gardener.

Lithograph of  Alexis Charles Henry de Tocqueville

Democracy in America: Alexis de Tocqueville's Introduction

A guide to Alexis de Tocqueville's landmark work surveying American republicanism in the 1830s.

The Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

This feature gives students a history of the Statue of Liberty and the waves of immigration to the U.S. around 1900.

  • Thoreau's Circle: Who's Who in Transcendentalism

    Created February 3, 2012
  • A Wrinkle in Time: The Board Game

    Created October 26, 2011
    Wrinkle in Time image

    This lesson invites students to reconfigure Meg’s journey into a board game where, as in the novel itself, Meg’s progress is either thwarted or advanced by aspects of her emotional responses to situations, her changing sense of self, and her physical and intellectual experiences.

  • The Creation of the Bill of Rights: "Retouching the Canvas"

    Created October 19, 2011
  • The Creation of the Bill of Rights: “Retouching the Canvas”

    Created October 17, 2011
    The Creation of the Bill of Rights: James Madison Statue

    This lesson will focus on the arguments either for or against the addition of a Bill of Rights between 1787 and 1789. By examining the views of prominent Americans in original documents, students will see that the issue at the heart of the debate was whether a Bill of Rights was necessary to secure and fulfill the objects of the American Revolution and the principles of the Declaration of Independence. Students will also gain an understanding of the origins of the Bill of Rights and how it came to be part of what Thomas Jefferson called "the American mind," as well as a greater awareness of the difficulties that proponents had to overcome in order to add the first ten Amendments to the Constitution.