For Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

Odyssey Online

Resources for elementary and middle school students to study ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Sub-Saharan cultures.

Mark Twain in His Times

Broad range of materials on Mark Twain the writer and his times.

Hawthorne in Salem

This site draws on the collections of The Peabody Essex Museum, the House of Seven Gables Historic Site, and the Salem Maritime National Historic site. It features critical approaches to Hawthorne’s work and includes a timeline, an image gallery, and links to several electronic editions.

painting of a man with knapsack walking over a bridge

Antislavery Literature Project

Primary source texts on the antislavery movement as well as podcasts and videos. Accompanied by teachers’ guides.

Anne Frank seated at desk, writing

Anne Frank House

The Anne Frank House in the center of Amsterdam was the hiding place where Anne Frank wrote her famous diary during World War Two. Excellent Holocaust and World War Two resource.

Alexis De Tocqueville Tour: Exploring Democracy in America

This site—hosted by C-SPAN—is based on a tour of De Tocqueville's route through America.

  • Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart: Teaching Through the Novel

    Created February 19, 2010
    Things Fall Apart books

    This lesson introduces students to Achebe's first novel and to his views on the role of the writer in his or her society.

  • Dust Bowl Days

    Eighteen-year-old mother from Oklahoma, now a California migrant.

    Students will be introduced to this dramatic era in our nation's history through photographs, songs and interviews with people who lived through the Dust Bowl.

  • Critical Ways of Seeing The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in Context

    Depiction of Huckleberry Finn on 1917 sheet music cover

    By studying Mark Twain's novel, Huckleberry Finn, and its critics with a focus on cultural context, students will develop essential analytical tools for navigating this text and for exploring controversies that surround this quintessential American novel.

  • Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes: Poems for a Democracy

    Walt Whitman.

    Walt Whitman sought to create a new and distinctly American form of poetry. His efforts had a profound influence on subsequent generations of American poets. In this lesson, students will explore the historical context of Whitman's concept of "democratic poetry" by reading his poetry and prose and by examining daguerreotypes taken circa 1850. Next, students will compare the poetic concepts and techniques behind Whitman's "I Hear America Singing" and Langston Hughes' "Let America Be America Again," and will have an opportunity to apply similar concepts and techniques in creating a poem from their own experience.