For Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
  • Launchpad: Frederick Douglass's “What To the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

    Created June 30, 2011

    Launchpad: Reading Carl Sandburg’s “Chicago”

    Carl Sandburg’s 1916 “Chicago” is one of the best known works of 20th century American literature. Using Internet resources, you will learn about the city that Sandburg documented in his poetry.

  • Twelve Angry Men: Trial by Jury as a Right and as a Political Institution

    Created October 28, 2010
    Twelve Angry Men: Image Still from original movie

    The classic American drama Twelve Angry Men serves as the starting point for a discussion of the constitutional right and civic function of the trial by jury. The lesson explores the specific provisions associated with this right as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the system.

    The Magna Carta: Bronze Doors

    The Magna Carta: Bronze Doors

    The bronze door at the U.S.</span></p></td></tr></tbody></table>	</div>
	
	
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    From the Pompeii Exhibit Gallery
    at the National Gallery of Art

    Pompeii, two seaside villas

  • Why Do We Remember Revere? Paul Revere's Ride in History and Literature

    Created October 14, 2010
    Why Do We Remember Revere?

    After an overview of the events surrounding Paul Revere's famous ride, this lesson challenges students to think about the reasons for that fame.  Using both primary and secondhand accounts, students compare the account of Revere's ride in Longfellow's famous poem with actual historical events, in order to answer the question: why does Revere's ride occupy such a prominent place in the American consciousness?

  • Chinua Achebe’s "Things Fall Apart": Oral and Literary Strategies

    Created October 13, 2010
    Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart: Oral and Literary Strategies

    Through close reading and textual analysis of Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe's 1958 novel about the British colonization of Nigeria, students learn how oral, linguistic, and literary strategies are used to present one’s own story and history through literature.

  • Shakespeare's "Macbeth": Fear and the "Dagger of the Mind"

    Created October 12, 2010
    Shakespeare's Macbeth: Dagger

    Shakespeare's preeminence as a dramatist rests in part on his capacity to create vivid metaphors and images that embody simple and powerful human emotions. This lesson is designed to help students understand how Shakespeare's language dramatizes one such emotion: fear.

  • Shakespeare's "Macbeth: Fear and the Motives of Evil

    Created October 12, 2010
    Shakespeare's Macbeth: Fiend

    Students search an online version of Shakespeare's Macbeth for clues to the motives behind Macbeth's precipitous descent into evil.

  • 300 Spartans: The Bridge Over the Hellespont

    Created October 8, 2010