For Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

The Magna Carta: Bronze Doors

The Magna Carta: Bronze Doors

The bronze door at the U.S.</span></p></td></tr></tbody></table>	</div>

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From the Pompeii Exhibit Gallery
at the National Gallery of Art

Pompeii, two seaside villas

  • Why Do We Remember Revere? Paul Revere's Ride in History and Literature

    Created October 14, 2010
    Why Do We Remember Revere?

    After an overview of the events surrounding Paul Revere's famous ride, this lesson challenges students to think about the reasons for that fame.  Using both primary and secondhand accounts, students compare the account of Revere's ride in Longfellow's famous poem with actual historical events, in order to answer the question: why does Revere's ride occupy such a prominent place in the American consciousness?

  • Chinua Achebe’s "Things Fall Apart": Oral and Literary Strategies

    Created October 13, 2010
    Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart: Oral and Literary Strategies

    Through close reading and textual analysis of Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe's 1958 novel about the British colonization of Nigeria, students learn how oral, linguistic, and literary strategies are used to present one’s own story and history through literature.

  • Shakespeare's "Macbeth": Fear and the "Dagger of the Mind"

    Created October 12, 2010
    Shakespeare's Macbeth: Dagger

    Shakespeare's preeminence as a dramatist rests in part on his capacity to create vivid metaphors and images that embody simple and powerful human emotions. This lesson is designed to help students understand how Shakespeare's language dramatizes one such emotion: fear.

  • Shakespeare's "Macbeth: Fear and the Motives of Evil

    Created October 12, 2010
    Shakespeare's Macbeth: Fiend

    Students search an online version of Shakespeare's Macbeth for clues to the motives behind Macbeth's precipitous descent into evil.

  • 300 Spartans: The Bridge Over the Hellespont

    Created October 8, 2010
  • Listening to Poetry: Sounds of the Sonnet

    Created October 8, 2010
    Listening to Poetry

    While teaching some of the formal terms used to describe sonnets will be one of the aims of this lesson, our starting point and central focus throughout will be learning to appreciate the sounds of poetry.

  • The Poet's Voice: Langston Hughes and You

    Created October 8, 2010
    The Poet's Voice: Langston Hughes

    Poets achieve popular acclaim only when they express clear and widely shared emotions with a forceful, distinctive, and memorable voice. But what is meant by voice in poetry, and what qualities have made the voice of Langston Hughes a favorite for so many people?

  • Childhood Through the Looking-Glass

    Created October 7, 2010
    Childhood Through the Looking-Glass

    Students explore Lewis Carroll’s imaginative visions of childhood, captured in his photography and in the words and art of his Alice in Wonderland stories. Students also compare and contrast Carroll’s Victorian view of childhood to that of Romantic poet and printer William Blake.