For Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
  • Lesson 3: Hopi Traditional Dance and Song

    Created November 18, 2015
    Language of place: Hopi planting corn

    An exploration of the symbolism and imagery of corn and environment as manifested in Hopi song and traditional dances. Students analyze examples of historical and contemporary Hopi song and examine images of Hopi dance in order to expand cultural awareness.

  • Lesson 2. Hopi Poetry

    Created November 18, 2015
    Language of place: Hopi planting corn

    A close study of the poetry of contemporary Hopi artist and poet, Ramson Lomatewama. Students analyze Lomatewama’s masterful use of figurative language that creates a sense of place and describes his intimate relationship with the land and his experience of corn.

    Lesson Plans: Grades 3-5
    Curriculum Unit

    Language of Place: Hopi Place Names, Poetry, Traditional Dance and Song (3 Lessons)

    Created November 13, 2015

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    The Unit

    Overview

    Language of place: Hopi planting corn

    Hopi corn farmer by Kurt Lomawaima.

    Credit: Reproduced with permission, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, all rights reserved.

    In my culture, we sing songs to show our happiness. We sing while we do our chores because songs seem to make the work go quickly and easily. We believe that when we sing songs, we are sharing our feelings of happiness with nature. Since the corn plants are also our children, we sing to the corn, too. Our elders tell us that when we sing to our corn children, we make them happy. When they are happy, they grow better.

    I was also taught that wherever there is singing, there is life. So when songs are sung, they too are born, just like people.

    — Ramson Lomatewama, poet

    In the summer of 2015, President Barack Obama made headlines when he officially returned the traditional Athabaskan name, Denali, to the largest mountain in North America. This act may have come as a surprise to some in this day and age when the importance of place names can be lost amid our modern technocracy. Many place names across our nation are imbued with history, culture, power, and significance that is often overlooked—but, through them the very essence and spirit of a place can be understood. Returning the name Denali to the mountain was a way of recognizing and honoring the relationship Native Alaskans have had with the mountain for centuries.

    This English Language Arts unit has students delve into the “language of place.” Through a careful study of various literary forms—place names, poetry, song and traditional dance—students can explore the landscape and culture of the Hopi Tribe from the southwestern United States. Through these forms of expression, student will have the opportunity to “read” the products of Hopi culture and engage in their rich cultural heritage through one of the Hopi’s most fundamental natural resources—corn!

    In Lesson 1, students will explore “Hopitutskwa,” the Hopi homeland, through maps and place names (using English translations) to make inferences about Hopi cultural relationships to landscape and place and uncover the importance of naming places in their own lives. Lesson 2 involves a study of contemporary Hopi poet, Ramson Lomatewama. Corn is a favorite subject of Lomatewama’s poetry, which is rich in figurative language describing the poet’s intimate relationship with the land. Lesson 3 has students experience traditional dance and song of the Hopi to further their understanding of this culture’s relationship to place.

    Guiding Questions

    • How do the Hopi use the language of place names, poetry, and song and traditional dance to demonstrate their cultural relationships between people and place?

    College and Career Readiness Standards

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.5.a
    Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.

    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.9 Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

    Background

    The Hopi Tribe is a sovereign nation inhabiting over 1.5 million acres in northeastern Arizona. The tribe has a rich connection with the landscape, place, and environment, where most Hopi people call home. The Hopi name for their homeland is “Hopitutskwa.” Part of the Colorado Plateau, this region is known for its high deserts, scattered forests, stark mesas, deep canyons, as well as for the Grand Canyon. The Hopi have lived here for centuries.

    Today, some Hopi people continue the traditional subsistence practice of dry land farming, especially to grow specific corn varieties that are highly valued for their spiritual and practical significance. Each variety of corn is used to make different traditional foods. This challenging task—growing corn in a dry, unirrigated, short-growing season environment—requires an intimate knowledge of the land, environment, crops, weather, and the ecology of the high desert. A profound knowledge of the northeastern Arizona environment pervades Hopi culture and language. A rich reverence and respect for corn cultivation is apparent in the art, poetry, songs, celebrations and culture of the Hopi people. The metaphor “corn is life” or “corn is our children” is often used to explain the dynamic Hopi relationship with corn and dry land farming. 

    Taken together, three Hopi language forms: place names; poetry; and song and traditional dance; can be an avenue to explore the centuries-old cultural relationship the Hopi people have with their land and the process of growing corn. Such rich descriptions allow readers and listeners to imagine and envision the landscape and environment of Arizona’s high desert. The language of place found in the place names, poems, song, and dance expressions open a window into Hopi culture and act as a springboard for further explorations into diverse relationships to landscape, environment and place. 

    Extended background: See the following pdf’s for valuable contextual background information on these topics:

    • Hopi Homeland
    • Corn in Hopi Culture
      • Corn as Crop for Hopi
      • Corn as Art and Essence of Hopi
    • Hopi Agricultural Practices – Cultural and Spiritual Significance
    • Language of Place Forms in Hopi Culture:
      • Place Names
      • Poetry
      • Song and Traditional Dance

    Additional Resources

    National Museum of the American Indian (images of Hopi corn-based artifacts and art):

    The following websites sponsored by the Hopi Tribe, its affiliated educational partners, as well as the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, offer additional information to supplement your classroom study of the Hopi and include images of villages, corn fields, and high desert environment: 

    The following picture books may be useful references:

    Gerald Dawavendewawas, The Butterfly Dance (Tales of the People). (New York: Abbeville Kids, 2001).

    Ramson Lomatewama, Songs to the Corn: A Hopi Poet Writes about Corn, illustrated by Jeffery Chapman. (Crystal Lake, IL: Rigby, 1997).

    Assessment

    Challenge students to research a poem or song that explores relationships between people and place.

    Note: The Poetry Foundation offers a poem sampler, Native American Poetry and Culture, which contains a selection of poets, poems, and articles—many deal with place and landscape. Here are some options from the Poetry Foundation sampler that may work with your students:

    Students should analyze the poem they have selected to write a short (3–5 paragraphs) explanation of the poem’s sense of place.

    In preparation for their writing, have them complete the following:

    1. Summarize the poem. What is it about? What is the setting? Who are the actors? 
    2. Provide some context about the poem. Who is the author? When was this written?  Where is the author from?
    3. Identify and explain examples of figurative language in the poem, quote it and explain what the author means or implies.
    4. Explain what is important to the author in this poem. What does he or she value? Why? How do you know?
    5. Discuss how the poet reflects his/her experience of place in the poem. How does the author express the place's significance? 
    6. Finally, ask students to sketch or draw the poem, carefully trying to capture the imagery or setting the author describes. 

    Creative Writing Option

    Ask students to write their own poetry or songs about a landscape or place that is important to them. Poems should include:

    • Vivid imagery: a sense of what it looks like, sounds like, feels like to be in that place
    • Connections between the poet (or other people) and the place described in the poem
    • Figurative language: similes, metaphors, and other types of figurative language to enrich the sense of place
    • Artwork: illustrations, sketches of the place or landscape being described

    Extending the Unit

    Option 1

    Hopi corn is available from heritage seed companies. Large and small grocery stores often sell products made from blue, white, yellow, and red corn. Challenge students to learn more about Hopi corn, its varieties, and the traditional (and nontraditional) foods that are made with heritage, native corn varieties. Cook at home or in class with recipes using blue corn. Taste-test many of the commercially available foods made from native corn varieties.

    Assignments could include:

    • Research and prepare a traditional Hopi dish using blue corn (many resources online for general searches of “Hopi blue corn recipes”);
    • Complete a scavenger hunt of your local grocery store to identify as many commercially available foods made from native corn varieties. Conduct a taste test with a few varieties and record your responses;
    • Cook with your class! The recipe for blue corn cakes is easy to follow and could be prepared in class. 

    Option 2

    Hopi culture has many elements that have continued or remained constant over time and many elements that have changed. Educational resources available on Crow Canyon Archaeological Center’s website support students as they research how Pueblo culture, which led in part to Hopi culture, has changed over the course of time.

    • Pueblo Indian History for Kids includes an online, interactive timeline where students can travel back in time before the Pueblo people of the southwest started farming. It guides students through the many changes Pueblo people, including the Hopi, have experienced.  
    • Video Perspectives on Pueblo History and Culture provides insight into the Pueblo peoples' oral tradition and examines how it helps keep their deep cultural heritage alive and shape their historical perspectives. The videos offer an archaeological understanding of Pueblo history, based on scientific method, including different—but complementary—perspectives.
    • People of the Mesa Verde Region delivers information on this region, which is divided among the three states—Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah—where more than 20,000 American Indians live today. The population of this region also consists of many non-Indians. All contribute to the complex fabric of community life, which reflects a unique blend of age-old traditions and 21st-century American culture.   

     

     

    The Lessons

    • Lesson 1. Hopi Place Names

      Created November 17, 2015
      Language of place: Hopi planting corn

      A guided exploration of “Hopitutskwa,” the Hopi homeland, through maps and place names. Using English translations, students make inferences about the Hopi cultural relationship to landscape and place. They examine regional place names of their own home communities and create personal maps by identifying and naming places of importance in their lives.

    • Lesson 2. Hopi Poetry

      Created November 18, 2015
      Language of place: Hopi planting corn

      A close study of the poetry of contemporary Hopi artist and poet, Ramson Lomatewama. Students analyze Lomatewama’s masterful use of figurative language that creates a sense of place and describes his intimate relationship with the land and his experience of corn.

    • Lesson 3: Hopi Traditional Dance and Song

      Created November 18, 2015
      Language of place: Hopi planting corn

      An exploration of the symbolism and imagery of corn and environment as manifested in Hopi song and traditional dances. Students analyze examples of historical and contemporary Hopi song and examine images of Hopi dance in order to expand cultural awareness.

    The Basics

    Grade Level

    3-5

    Subject Areas
    • Literature and Language Arts > Genre > Common Core
    • History and Social Studies > Themes > Common Core
    • History and Social Studies > Place > The Americas
    • History and Social Studies > People > Native American
    • Literature and Language Arts > Genre > Poetry
    Skills
    • Creative writing
    • Critical analysis
    • Interpretation
    • Making inferences and drawing conclusions
    • Map Skills
    • Musical analysis
    • Poetry analysis
    • Poetry writing
  • Lesson Three. Analyzing “Intercepted Intelligence”

    Created November 12, 2015
    Diplomacy Challenge: Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror

    In this lesson, students analyze a primary source document: A Papal Bull issued by Pope Pius V in 1570, excommunicating Queen Elizabeth of England.

  • Lesson Two. Empire Intelligence Briefings

    Created November 6, 2015
    Diplomacy Challenge: Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror

    A key role of diplomats is to gather and analyze intelligence. In this lesson students, acting as diplomats, will present a short “intelligence briefing” to the representatives of the other Early Modern empires.

  • Lesson One: Learning about Early Modern Era Empires

    Created October 29, 2015
    Diplomacy Challenge: Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror

    A key role of diplomats is to gather and analyze intelligence. In this lesson, students acting as diplomats, will prepare a short intelligence briefing on their assigned empire to present to the representatives of the other modern empires.

    Lesson Plans: Grades 9-12
    Curriculum Unit

    The Diplomacy Challenge (7 Lessons)

    Created October 22, 2015

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    The Unit

    Overview

    Diplomacy Challenge: Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror

    Follower of Gentile Bellini, Portrait of Mehmet II (1432–1481).

    Credit: National Gallery, London. Yorck Project. Public Domain 1.0

    "One must remember that the diplomat’s hope is in man’s reason and good will…. Even Machiavelli himself was not in practice Machiavellian.”

    —Garrett Mattingly, Renaissance Diplomacy

    During the Early Modern era (1450–1750), the expansion in maritime trade and the incorporation of the Americas into worldwide exchanges meant the world became increasingly interconnected. These connections led to a greater need for diplomatic relations with other states. Like many modern institutions, diplomacy as we know it today had its origins during this period. 

    This unit asks teams of students to play the role of diplomats in the Early Modern era. Each team is charged with a particular empire, and students compare the perceived national interests of their empires to the empires of other teams. In the process, they must consider multiple perspectives and anticipate the actions and reactions of their diplomatic peers.

    Students will do the authentic work of diplomats by first gathering intelligence through selected primary and secondary sources, then by building relationships with other diplomats through a reception banquet, and finally by negotiating treaties in the interest of their empires.

    This unit has been conceived as a process. To gain maximum benefit, it is suggested that the lessons be taught sequentially.

    Guiding Questions

    • How did Early Modern empires use diplomacy to maintain and expand their power?
    • How do diplomats use intelligence to build relationships?

    College and Career Readiness Standards

    • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.7
      Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

    Background

    World historians do not always agree on periodization, as a review of textbook chronologies will show. Most, however, do concur that the mid-15th century was a key turning point in World History. European exploration and settlement of the Americas and the cultural and economic exchange that resulted profoundly transformed the world. The Columbian Exchange; the role of China as a both consumer and supplier in the world economy; the development of the plantation system and chattel slavery; as well as the rise of the modern corporation all emerged during this period, which most historians call Early Modern (1450–1750).

    Diplomacy is a good way to teach students about the Early Modern era. Diplomacy as we know it today, has its origins during this period. Many of the well-known Early Modern primary source texts we have are in fact documents related to diplomacy. Having students think like diplomats requires them to consider other perspectives. Primary source documents and information become “intelligence” that student need to analyze from the perspective of not only one empire but of others, as well.

    The Early Modern era was the first time many empires and kingdoms in Africa and Asia had to deal directly with representatives of European empires, who were persistent in their presence and demanded recognition as equals. These “hairy barbarians”—as they were called in Japan—insisted on trade on their terms, often with the threat of force behind it.

    Diplomacy, however did not only take place between European and Asian or European and African monarchs. Increased interaction between Asian states, for example, occurred as well. Letters between the Ottoman Sultan and the Safavid Shah show how the religious schisms within Islam paralleled those within Christian Europe.

    Our unit also is about more than European conquest. It is important for students to understand that a great deal of Early Modern history was being made by non-European empires even after Spain and European empires settled the Americas.

    We should not forget that the Early Modern period is the time of the Muslim “Gun Powder Empires” (The Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughals), which dominated Central Europe to India. As historian Philip Curtain notes, the European economy was still less productive than the Indian economy, which during the time of Akbar was the wealthiest empire in the world. The Ottomans were the dominant military and political power in Central Europe and the Middle East. Although they struck fear in the hearts of Western Christian monarchs, Europe was only one of many concerns for the Ottomans, who were frequently at war with their Shi’ite Muslim neighbors the Safavids to the East.

    In East Asia, the Qing Empire already had a well-established maritime trade network within East Asia. No doubt, Europeans were often intentional “disrupters” of the trade systems they joined, but in the Indian Ocean, up until the mid-18th century, Asians carried more trade in the Indian Ocean than Europeans did.

    [One note on this unit: While the lessons cover a range of empires and kingdoms throughout Afro-Eurasia, they do not address two key American empires (Aztec and Inca) in existence at the time of the European conquest because, as political units, those empires ceased to exist by the early 16th century.]

    Assessment

    As a summative assessment, student will write a compare and contrast essay of two Early Modern empires by responding to the prompt:

    The Early Modern era saw the rise and expansion of global empires. Compare and contrast the economic policies and religious attitudes of one land-based empire and one sea-based empire during this time period. Address how these policies and attitudes were used by the empires to maintain and expand their power.

    Extending the Unit

    Have students research the crops and food that was exchanged as a result of Early Modern diplomacy and create a Columbian Exchange Cookbook.

    Additional resources:

    The Lessons

    The Basics

    Grade Level

    9-12

    Subject Areas
    • History and Social Studies > Themes > Common Core
    • History and Social Studies > World > The Modern World (1500 CE-Present)
    • History and Social Studies > Themes > Globalization
    • History and Social Studies > Themes > Politics and Citizenship
    • History and Social Studies > Themes > War and Foreign Policy
    Skills
    • Critical analysis
    • Critical thinking
    • Interpretation
    • Making inferences and drawing conclusions
    • Map Skills
    • Using primary sources
  • Lesson Three. The Power of the Majority over Thought

    Created October 15, 2015
    Alexis de Tocqueville portrait

    In Tocqueville’s discussion of how the majority in America constrains freedom of thought, he makes some of the most extreme criticisms against democracy. For example, he says “I do not know any country where, in general, less independence of mind and genuine freedom of discussion reign than in America”; and, “there is no freedom of mind in America.”

  • Lesson Two. The Tyranny of the Majority

    Created October 14, 2015
    Alexis de Tocqueville portrait

    In this lesson, students continue their examination of Tocqueville’s argument about the power of the majority and its consequences. Having suggested previously that the majority can crush a minority without even hearing its screams, he elaborates on the dangers of unchecked and unlimited power in democratic America and how to deal with it.

  • Lesson One. The Omnipotence of the Majority

    Created October 14, 2015
    Alexis de Tocqueville portrait

    In this lesson, students are introduced to Tocqueville’s argument about the “omnipotent” power of the majority in America and its consequences. After an initial statement that the “very essence” of democracy is majority rule, he contrasts the means by which state constitutions artificially increase the power of the majority with the U.S. Constitution, which checks that power.