• The Royal Art of Benin

    Benin Kingdom people, Nigeria, mask

    This lesson plan introduces students to art of the West African kingdom of Benin, which flourished from the 12th or 13th to the end of the 19th centuries in what is now southern Nigeria. Students learn about how the royal power of the king of Benin was communicated through brass plaques and use symbolism to create their own paper plaques.

  • Poems of Tennyson and Noyes: Pictures in Words

    Photograph of Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

    Striking examples of poetic "pictures"-not just vivid images but the entire mental picture conjured up by a poet-are to be found in "The Charge of the Light Brigade," by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and "The Highwayman," by Alfred Noyes. As they explore the means by which Tennyson and  Noyes create these compelling pictures in words, students will also learn the critical terminology to analyze and describe a variety of poetic techniques and will have an opportunity to create their own pictures in words.

  • Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes: Poems for a Democracy

    Walt Whitman.

    Walt Whitman sought to create a new and distinctly American form of poetry. His efforts had a profound influence on subsequent generations of American poets. In this lesson, students will explore the historical context of Whitman's concept of "democratic poetry" by reading his poetry and prose and by examining daguerreotypes taken circa 1850. Next, students will compare the poetic concepts and techniques behind Whitman's "I Hear America Singing" and Langston Hughes' "Let America Be America Again," and will have an opportunity to apply similar concepts and techniques in creating a poem from their own experience.

  • Portrait of a Hero

    Benjamin  Franklin.

    Heroes abound throughout history and in our everyday lives. After completing the activities, students will be able to understand the meaning of the words hero and heroic.

  • Dust Bowl Days

    Eighteen-year-old mother from Oklahoma, now a California migrant.

    Students will be introduced to this dramatic era in our nation's history through photographs, songs and interviews with people who lived through the Dust Bowl.

  • African-American Soldiers After World War I: Had Race Relations Changed?

    Photograph showing six people, including Charles Young

    In this lesson, students view archival photographs, combine their efforts to comb through a database of more than 2,000 archival newspaper accounts about race relations in the United States, and read newspaper articles written from different points of view about post-war riots in Chicago.

  • Lesson 4: The Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Romans, and Us

    Created May 9, 2007
    The history of the development of the Western world's alphabets is long and  colorful.

    The purpose of this lesson is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the three previous lessons: Lesson One: The Phoenicians and the Beginnings of the Alphabet Lesson Two: The Greek Alphabet: more familiar than you think! Lesson Three: The Alphabet: The Roman Alphabet is our Alphabet

  • Lesson 2: The Greek Alphabet: more familiar than you think!

    "Omega" is the last letter in the Greek alphabet.

    This lesson is about the Greeks, who inherited the alphabet invented by the Phoenicians, and used it to write their great literature.

  • Lesson 3: The Roman Alphabet is our Alphabet

    The Romans used the first version of the modern western alphabet.

    The Romans developed the alphabet we still use today. In this lesson we will introduce the Romans and ask how their alphabet got to us.

  • Lesson 1: The Phoenicians and the Beginnings of the Alphabet

    "Aleph," the first letter in the Phoenician alphabet

    This lesson is about the Phoenicians, who invented the alphabet inherited by the Greeks, Romans, and eventually, us.