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National Gallery of Art

The site spans a wide variety of topics with in-depth studies, online tours, podcasts, and videos of artists, media, and movements from exhibits housed in the National Gallery of Art. Discover highlights of the National Gallery of Art collections with Your Art app for iPhone and iPod Touch.

Louvre Museum

Official site with "Eye-opener" and “Personal Space” features for in-depth and custom viewing of the Louvre's great collection.

Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art permanent collection includes more than 36,000 objects. In this database you will find records for all of the objects in the collection.

  • Australian Aboriginal Art and Storytelling

    Australian Aboriginal man.

    Australian Aboriginal art is one of the oldest continuing art traditions in the world.  Much of the most important knowledge of aboriginal society was conveyed through different kinds of storytelling.

  • Benjamin Franklin's Many "Hats"

    Hiram Powers (1805–1873), Benjamin Franklin, 1862

    Ben Franklin, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and of the Constitution was also a philanthropist, a community leader, patriot, and Founding Father. This lesson plan exemplifies all our new country fought for in the Revolutionary War: individualism, democracy, community, patriotism, scientific inquiry and invention, and the rights of “We the People.”

  • Dust Bowl Days

    Eighteen-year-old mother from Oklahoma, now a California migrant.

    Students will be introduced to this dramatic era in our nation's history through photographs, songs and interviews with people who lived through the Dust Bowl.

  • Lesson 1: The Phoenicians and the Beginnings of the Alphabet

    "Aleph," the first letter in the Phoenician alphabet

    This lesson is about the Phoenicians, who invented the alphabet inherited by the Greeks, Romans, and eventually, us.

  • Rudyard Kipling's "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi": Mixing Fact and Fiction

    Portrait of Rudyard Kipling.

    In this lesson, students will use interactive materials to learn about Rudyard Kipling's life and times, read an illustrated version of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," and learn how Kipling effectively uses personification by mixing fact and fiction.

  • Walt Whitman to Langston Hughes: Poems for a Democracy

    Walt Whitman.

    Walt Whitman sought to create a new and distinctly American form of poetry. His efforts had a profound influence on subsequent generations of American poets. In this lesson, students will explore the historical context of Whitman's concept of "democratic poetry" by reading his poetry and prose and by examining daguerreotypes taken circa 1850. Next, students will compare the poetic concepts and techniques behind Whitman's "I Hear America Singing" and Langston Hughes' "Let America Be America Again," and will have an opportunity to apply similar concepts and techniques in creating a poem from their own experience.

  • Rudyard Kipling's "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi": Mixing Words and Pictures

    Portrait of Rudyard Kipling.

    In this lesson, students will read an illustrated version of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," examine how Kipling and visual artists mix observation with imagination to create remarkable works, and follow similar principles to create a work of their own.