Blogs tagged "Native Americans"

The National Parks and History

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. Source: author photograph
It was, and remains, the bluest blue I have ever seen. As I stood on a rock jutting out over Crater Lake, the remnants of a massive volcanic eruption 7,700 years ago, I thought about the immensity of time and history that gives this place shape and meaning. Then I leapt. The freezing cold water disrupted these thoughts for the moment, but the National Parks have a way of sticking with you.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Top History and Social Studies Resources for January

Image from interactive America on the sidelines
EDSITEment offers a wealth of history and social studies lessons, features, and interactives for your classroom. Some of our most popular lessons for January are listed below. We’ve also suggested related lessons. Most of these resources are designed for grades 9-12. All resources are lessons, except where indicated. Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Summer 2017 Professional Development for K-12 Educators in the Humanities

Participants in “The Most Southern Place on Earth” 2016 Landmarks workshop
Each year, the National Endowment for the Humanities offers tuition-free opportunities for school teachers to study a variety of humanities subjects such as architecture, history, literature, music and philosophy with some of the finest scholars and teachers in America. Topics range from African Americans in the Making of New England to Women Making Change at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Stipends of $600-$3,300 help cover expenses for these one- to four-week programs.For information and application instructions, please visit the websites for individual projects.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Q and A with Film Historian Michael Sragow

Michael Sragow
Tell us about the goals of the new Moviegoer series at the Library of America. Most film lovers are also book lovers, and vice versa. The Moviegoer aims to satisfy their dual appetites.Read More »

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Warning: The Tyranny of the Majority

“First Blood.” This 1812 political cartoon shows the warring Federalists and Rep
A French aristocrat visits Jacksonian AmericaIn 1831, an ambitious and unusually perceptive twenty-five-year-old French aristocrat, Alexis de Tocqueville, visited the United States. His nine-month sojourn led to the writing of Democracy in America, universally regarded as one of the most influential books ever written.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings