Blogs tagged "martin luther king"

Martin Luther: A Conversation Part I

Martin Luther, engraved by Theodore Knesing
Craig Harline, professor of history at Brigham Young University, received an NEH Public Scholar grant to write about Martin Luther between the years 1517 and 1522. His book, A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation, was published by Oxford University Press in October 2017. Part I of a two-part conversation between Craig Harline and EDSITEment follows.How did you become interested in Martin Luther, and when did you decide to write a book about him? Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Malcolm X: A Radical Vision for Civil Rights

Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
When most people think of the civil rights movement, they think of Martin Luther King, Jr., whose "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1963 and his acceptance of the Peace Prize the following year,  secured his place as the voice of non-violent, mass protest in the 1960s.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Top History and Social Studies Resources for January

Image from interactive America on the sidelines
EDSITEment offers a wealth of history and social studies lessons, features, and interactives for your classroom. Some of our most popular lessons for January are listed below. We’ve also suggested related lessons. Most of these resources are designed for grades 9-12. All resources are lessons, except where indicated. Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Dr. King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail

Martin Luther King Memorial
Martin Luther King's most well-known writing is his "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He began writing the lengthy essay while jailed over Easter weekend in 1963. He eventually arranged its publication as part of a public relations strategy to bring national attention to the struggle for civil rights in the South.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

The Selma to Montgomery March and Passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965

Marchers carrying banner "We march with Selma!" on street in Harlem, New York
Students love a good fight. From the Boston Tea Party to the Vietnam War, students’ genuine interest in historical protests is as recurrent a theme in the classroom as uprisings and demonstrations are in human history. Teachers sometimes wonder why the fight for rights and for a redress of grievances—more than other historical themes—regularly awakens their students to the lessons of history and gets them truly engaged in content.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings