September 21

African American abolitionist Maria W. Miller Stewart delivers speech at Franklin Hall

September 21, 1832

Related Lessons

  • Slave Narratives: Constructing U.S. History Through Analyzing Primary Sources
    Lesson Plan / Art & Culture
    Slave Narratives: Constructing U.S. History Through Analyzing Primary Sources

    The realities of slavery and Reconstruction hit home in poignant oral histories from the Library of Congress. In these activities, students research narratives from the Federal Writers' Project and describe the lives of former African slaves in the U.S. -- both before and after emancipation. From varied stories, students sample the breadth of individual experiences, make generalizations about the effects of slavery and Reconstruction on African Americans, and evaluate primary source documents.

  • What is History? Timelines and Oral Histories
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    What is History? Timelines and Oral Histories

    This lesson plan addresses the ways people learn about events from the past and discusses how historical accounts are influenced by the perspective of the person giving the account. To understand that history is made up of many people’s stories of the past, students interview family members about the same event and compare the ifferent versions, construct a personal history timeline and connect it to larger historical events, and synthesize eyewitness testimony from different sources to create their own "official" account.

  • What Makes a Hero?
    Lesson Plan / Literature & Language Arts
    What Makes a Hero?

    A common lament one hears today is that young people lack heroes to emulate. Is that true? After completing this lesson plan, students will be able to describe what makes a hero in various contexts.

Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, first U.S. daily newspaper, published

September 21, 1784

Related Lessons

  • Colonial Broadsides and the American Revolution
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Colonial Broadsides and the American Revolution

    Drawing on the resources of the Library of Congress's Printed Ephemera Collection, this lesson helps students experience the news as the colonists heard it: by means of broadsides, notices written on disposable, single sheets of paper that addressed virtually every aspect of the American Revolution.

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UN establishes International Day of Peace

September 21, 1981

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: Postwar Disillusionment and the Quest for Peace, 1921–1929
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: Postwar Disillusionment and the Quest for Peace, 1921–1929

    Although antiwar organizations existed even before World War I, it was during the interwar period that pacifism became the fastest-growing movement in America. Numerous American politicians, businessmen, journalists, and activists made proposals for multilateral agreements on arms control and collective security. Through an examination of memoirs, photographs, and other primary source documents, students examine the rise of antiwar sentiment in the United States, as well as some of the concrete measures taken during the 1920s to prevent the outbreak of future wars.

  • Lesson 4: Fighting for Peace: The Fate of Wilson's Fourteen Points
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 4: Fighting for Peace: The Fate of Wilson's Fourteen Points

    In January 1918, less than one year after the United States entered World War I, President Woodrow Wilson announced his Fourteen Points to try to ensure permanent peace and to make the world safe for democracy. Wilson's aims included freedom of the seas, free trade, and, most important, an international organization dedicated to collective security and the spreading of democracy. Through the use of primary source documents and maps, students examine Wilson's Fourteen Points, as well as his efforts to have them incorporated into the final peace treaties.

  • The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

    Was the Treaty of Versailles, which formally concluded World War I, a legitimate attempt by the victorious powers to prevent further conflict, or did it place an unfair burden on Germany? This lesson helps students respond to the question in an informed manner. Activities involve primary sources, maps, and other supporting documents related to the peace process and its reception by the German public and German politicians.