September 3

Stars and Stripes flies for the first time

September 3, 1777

Related Lessons

Wilson embarks on tour to promote League of Nations

September 3, 1919

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 2. The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: Disagreement Over the League
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2. The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: Disagreement Over the League

    American foreign policy debate over U.S. entry into the League of Nations-collective security versus national sovereignty, idealism versus pragmatism, the responsibilities of powerful nations, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals, the idea of America. Understanding the debate over the League and the consequences of its failure provides insight into international affairs in the years since Great War. In this lesson, students read the words and listen to the voices of some central participants in the debate over the League of Nations.

  • Lesson 3: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: Five Camps: From Voices of Consent to Voices of Dissent
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: Five Camps: From Voices of Consent to Voices of Dissent

    American foreign resonates with the debate over U.S. entry into the League of Nations-collective security versus national sovereignty, idealism versus pragmatism, the responsibilities of powerful nations, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals, the idea of America. Understanding the debate over the League and the consequences of its failure provides insight into international affairs in the years since the Great War and beyond. In this lesson, students read the words and listen to the voices of some central participants in the debate over the League of Nations.

  • Lesson 1: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: League of Nations Basics
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: League of Nations Basics

    American foreign policy resonates with the same issues as the debate over U.S. entry into the League of Nations-collective security versus national sovereignty, idealism versus pragmatism, the responsibilities of powerful nations, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals, the idea of America. Understanding the debate over the League and the consequences of its ultimate failure provides insight into international affairs in the years since the end of the Great War and beyond. In this lesson, students read the words and listen to the voices of some central participants in the debate over the League of Nations.

Treaty of Paris is signed, ending the American Revolutionary War

September 3, 1783

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 3: Ending the War, 1783
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: Ending the War, 1783

    During the Revolutionary War there were several attempts made to end the fighting. In this lesson students will consider the various peace attempts made by both sides during the Revolutionary War.

  • Voices of the American Revolution
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Voices of the American Revolution

    This lesson helps students "hear" some of the diverse colonial voices that, in the course of time and under the pressure of novel ideas and events, contributed to the American Revolution.  Students analyze a variety of primary documents illustrating the diversity of religious, political, social, and economic motives behind competing perspectives on questions of independence and rebellion.

Frederick Douglass makes his dramatic escape from slavery in Maryland

September 3, 1838

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Related Student Resources

  • Student Resource / History & Social Studies
    Launchpad: Frederick Douglass's “What To the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

    Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was a former slave who became the greatest abolitionist orator of the antebellum period. During the Civil War he worked tirelessly for the emancipation of the four million enslaved African Americans. In the decades after the war, he was the most influential African American leader in the nation.

    He delivered this speech on July 5, 1852. It is generally considered his greatest and one of the greatest speeches of the 19th century. Before you read the speech you can follow these links to learn more about Douglass’s life and the evolution of his thought in this period.