June 8

James Madison proposes the Bill of Rights

June 8, 1789

Related Lessons

  • The Creation of the Bill of Rights: "Retouching the Canvas"
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Creation of the Bill of Rights: "Retouching the Canvas"

    This lesson will focus on the arguments either for or against the addition of a Bill of Rights between 1787 and 1789. By examining the views of prominent Americans in original documents, students will see that the issue at the heart of the debate was whether a Bill of Rights was necessary to secure and fulfill the objects of the American Revolution and the principles of the Declaration of Independence. Students will also gain an understanding of the origins of the Bill of Rights and how it came to be part of what Thomas Jefferson called "the American mind," as well as a greater awareness of the difficulties that proponents had to overcome in order to add the first ten Amendments to the Constitution.

Related Student Resources

Frank Lloyd Wright, American modernist architect, is born

June 8, 1867

Emily Dickinson’s letter asking, “Will you be my preceptor?” is received by Thomas Wentworth Higginson

June 8, 1862

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: In Emily Dickinson's Own Words: Letters and Poems
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: In Emily Dickinson's Own Words: Letters and Poems

    Reading Emily Dickinson’s letters alongside her poems helps students to better appreciate a remarkable voice in American literature, grasp how Dickinson perceived herself and her poetry, and—perhaps most relevant to their own endeavors—consider the ways in which a writer constructs a “supposed person.”

  • Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: Responding to Emily Dickinson: Poetic Analysis

    In this lesson, students will explore Dickinson’s poem “Safe in their Alabaster Chambers” both as it was published as well as how it developed through Dickinson’s correspondence with her sister-in-law Susan Huntington Gilbert Dickinson.

  • Lesson 3: Emulating Emily Dickinson: Poetry Writing
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: Emulating Emily Dickinson: Poetry Writing

    In this lesson, students closely examine Dickinson’s poem “There’s a certain slant of light” in order to understand her craft. Students explore different components of Dickinson’s poetry and then practice their own critical and poetry writing skills in an emulation exercise. Finally, in the spirit of Dickinson’s correspondences, students will exchange their poems and offer informed critiques of each others’ work.

Related Student Resources