May 19

Malcolm X, African American activist, born

May 19, 1926

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Malcolm X argued that America was too racist in its institutions and people to offer hope to blacks. In contrast with Malcolm X's black separatism, Martin Luther King, Jr. offered what he considered "the more excellent way of love and nonviolent protest" as a means of building an integrated community of blacks and whites in America. This lesson will contrast the respective aims and means of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. to evaluate the possibilities for black American progress in the 1960s.

Lorraine Hansberry, American playwright, is born

May 19, 1930

Related Lessons

President John Quincy Adams signs protective tariff (“tariff of abominations”)

May 19, 1828

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: An Early Threat of Secession: The Missouri Compromise of 1820 and the Nullification Crisis
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: An Early Threat of Secession: The Missouri Compromise of 1820 and the Nullification Crisis

    Americans affirmed their independence with the ringing declaration that “all men are created equal.” But some of them owned African slaves, and were unwilling to give them up as they formed new federal and state governments. So “to form a more perfect union” in 1787, certain compromises were made in the Constitution regarding slavery. This settled the slavery controversy for the first few decades of the American republic, but this situation changed with the application of Missouri for statehood in 1819.