February 8

15h Amendment ratified guarantees the right to vote regardless of race

February 8, 1870

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of War
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of War

    This lesson covers two essential aspects of Reconstruction: the condition of the southern states at the close of the war and Lincoln’s plan for restoring them to the Union. In examining the conditions of the southern states, students consider both the physical conditions (i.e., the impact of the devastation of war) and the political condition of these states (i.e., what was the proper relationship between southern states and the Union upon their surrender at Appomattox?)

  • Lesson 2: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Politics of Reconstruction
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Politics of Reconstruction

    In reviewing events, documentary evidence, and biographical information, students come to understand the complex nature of political decision-making in the United States. In this lesson, they consider the momentous questions facing the country during the Reconstruction debate by weighing the many factors that went into the solutions offered. Students also think critically as they consider whether and how other solutions might have played out.

  • Lesson 3: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Reconstruction
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Reconstruction

    In this lesson, students examine the development of new constitutions in the reconstructed South. They also consider the political and social realities created by a dramatically changed electorate. In gaining a firmer grasp of the causes for the shifting alliances of this time, students see how far-reaching the consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction era were and how much these events continue to shape our collective destiny today.

Dawes Act passed—Indians living apart from tribe granted citizenship

February 8, 1887

Related Lessons

  • Life on the Great Plains
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Life on the Great Plains

    Examine the history and geography of a region that has been at the heart of the American experience.

  • Native American Cultures Across the U.S.
    Lesson Plan / Art & Culture
    Native American Cultures Across the U.S.

    This lesson discusses the differences between common representations of Native Americans within the U.S. and a more differentiated view of historical and contemporary cultures of five American Indian tribes living in different geographical areas. Students will learn about customs and traditions such as housing, agriculture, and ceremonial dress for the Tlingit, Dinè, Lakota, Muscogee, and Iroquois peoples.

  • Not "Indians," Many Tribes: Native American Diversity
    Lesson Plan / Art & Culture
    Not "Indians," Many Tribes: Native American Diversity

    Students study the interaction between environment and culture as they learn about three vastly different Native groups in a game-like activity that uses vintage photographs, traditional stories, photos of artifacts, and recipes.

  • The Native Americans' Role in the American Revolution: Choosing Sides
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Native Americans' Role in the American Revolution: Choosing Sides

    Native American groups had to choose the loyalist or patriot cause—or somehow maintain a neutral stance during the Revolutionary War. Students will analyze maps, treaties, congressional records, first-hand accounts, and correspondence to determine the different roles assumed by Native Americans in the American Revolution and understand why the various groups formed the alliances they did.

Elizabeth Bishop, American poet, is born

February 8, 1911

D.W. Griffith film “Birth of a Nation” premieres

February 8, 1915

Related Lessons