February 4

Rosa Parks birthday

February 4, 1913

Related Lessons

  • Ordinary People, Ordinary Places: The Civil Rights Movement
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Ordinary People, Ordinary Places: The Civil Rights Movement

    By researching these "ordinary" people and the now historic places where they brought about change, students will discover how the simple act of sitting at a lunch counter in North Carolina could be considered revolutionary, and how, combined with countless other acts of nonviolent protest across the nation, it could lead to major legislation in the area of civil rights for African Americans.

Disney film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the 1st animated feature, is released

February 4, 1938

Related Lessons

  • Fairy Tales Around the World
    Lesson Plan / Art & Culture
    Fairy Tales Around the World

    In this lesson plan, students read and learn to understand fairy tales in order to recognize their universal literary structures and themes. They compare similar fairy tales from different cultural and geographic regions of the world to see over-arching plots featuring conflicts between good and evil and imagery and motifs that are repeated across many cultures and time periods.

Charles Lindbergh, American aviator, is born

February 4, 1902

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 3: U.S. Neutrality and the War in Europe, 1939–1940
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: U.S. Neutrality and the War in Europe, 1939–1940

    The outbreak of war in Europe in September 1939 posed a serious challenge to U.S. neutrality. On the one hand, Americans' sympathies lay overwhelmingly with Great Britain and its allies; on the other hand, public sentiment overwhelmingly favored staying out of the war. Through a study of contemporary documents, students learn about the difficult choices faced by the Roosevelt administration during the first fifteen months of World War II, culminating in the decision to provide direct military aid to Great Britain.

  • Lesson 4: The Great Debate: Internationalists vs. Isolationists
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 4: The Great Debate: Internationalists vs. Isolationists

    President Roosevelt's proposal to provide direct military aid to Great Britain launched a nationwide debate over foreign policy that lasted through most of 1941. Should the United States observe its traditional policy of non-involvement in European affairs (to which World War I had been a notable exception), or should the United States take whatever steps were necessary (up to and, perhaps, including direct involvement in the war) to prevent a German victory?In this lesson students are introduced to the main arguments used by both sides in this great debate. Through the use of an interactive map and primary source documents, students trace the events of 1941, and think critically about what foreign policy would have best served national interests.