February 3

Norman Rockwell, American illustrator, is born

February 3, 1894

Related Lessons

15th Amendment, granting black men suffrage, ratified

February 3, 1870

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of War
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of War

    This lesson covers two essential aspects of Reconstruction: the condition of the southern states at the close of the war and Lincoln’s plan for restoring them to the Union. In examining the conditions of the southern states, students consider both the physical conditions (i.e., the impact of the devastation of war) and the political condition of these states (i.e., what was the proper relationship between southern states and the Union upon their surrender at Appomattox?)

  • Lesson 2: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Politics of Reconstruction
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Politics of Reconstruction

    In reviewing events, documentary evidence, and biographical information, students come to understand the complex nature of political decision-making in the United States. In this lesson, they consider the momentous questions facing the country during the Reconstruction debate by weighing the many factors that went into the solutions offered. Students also think critically as they consider whether and how other solutions might have played out.

  • Lesson 3: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Reconstruction
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 3: The Battle Over Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Reconstruction

    In this lesson, students examine the development of new constitutions in the reconstructed South. They also consider the political and social realities created by a dramatically changed electorate. In gaining a firmer grasp of the causes for the shifting alliances of this time, students see how far-reaching the consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction era were and how much these events continue to shape our collective destiny today.

  • The Emancipation Proclamation: Freedom's First Steps
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Emancipation Proclamation: Freedom's First Steps

    Why was the Emancipation Proclamation important? While the Civil War began as a war to restore the Union, not to end slavery, by 1862 President Abraham Lincoln came to believe that he could save the Union only by broadening the goals of the war. Students can explore the obstacles and alternatives America faced in making the journey toward "a more perfect Union."

American modernist Gertrude Stein born

February 3, 1874