January 6

Saint Joan of Arc is born

January 6, 1412

Related Lessons

  • Witnesses to Joan of Arc and The Hundred Years' War
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Witnesses to Joan of Arc and The Hundred Years' War

    Joan of Arc is likely one of France's most famous historical figures, and has been mythologized in popular lore, literature, and film. She is also an exceptionally well-documented historical figure. Through such firsthand accounts students can trace Joan's history from childhood, through her death, and on to her nullification trial.

Carl Sandburg, American poet, historian, and folklorist, is born

January 6, 1878

Related Lessons

  • Carl Sandburg's "Chicago": Bringing a Great City Alive
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Carl Sandburg's "Chicago": Bringing a Great City Alive

    In this lesson students examine primary documents including photographs, film, maps, and essays to learn about Chicago at the turn of the 20th century and make predictions about Carl Sandburg's famous poem. After examining the poem's use of personification and apostrophe, students write their own pieces about beloved places with Sandburg's poem as a model.

President Franklin Roosevelt delivers the Four Freedoms speech

January 6, 1941

Related Lessons

  • FDR's "Four Freedoms" Speech: Freedom by the Fireside
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    FDR's "Four Freedoms" Speech: Freedom by the Fireside

    One of the most famous political speeches on freedom in the twentieth century was delivered by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in his 1941 State of the Union message to Congress.This lesson examines some of the nuances  and ambiguities inherent in the rhetorical use of "freedom." The objective is to encourage students to glimpse the broad range of hopes and aspirations that are expressed in the call of—and for—freedom.