October 7

Stamp Act Congress convenes in New York

October 7, 1765

Related Lessons

Edgar Allan Poe dies

October 7, 1849

Related Lessons

  • Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, and the Unreliable Biographers
    Lesson Plan / Literature & Language Arts
    Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, and the Unreliable Biographers

    We are naturally curious about the lives (and deaths) of authors, especially those, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Ambrose Bierce, who have left us with so many intriguing mysteries. But does biographical knowledge add to our understanding of their works? And if so, how do we distinguish between the accurate detail and the rumor, between truth and slander? In this lesson, students become literary sleuths, attempting to separate biographical reality from myth. They also become careful critics, taking a stand on whether extra-literary materials such as biographies and letters should influence the way readers understand a writer's texts.

  • Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, and the Unreliable Narrator
    Lesson Plan / Literature & Language Arts
    Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, and the Unreliable Narrator

    Help your students consider a variety of narrative stances in Edgar Allen Poe's short story, "Tell Tale Heart," and Ambrose Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge."

  • Tales of the Supernatural
    Lesson Plan / Art & Culture
    Tales of the Supernatural

    Examine the relationship between science and the supernatural in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the “horror stories” of Hawthorne and Poe.

“The Children’s Poet” James Whitcomb Riley born

October 7, 1849

American Black Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad born

October 7, 1897

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 2: Black Separatism or the Beloved Community? Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Malcolm X argued that America was too racist in its institutions and people to offer hope to blacks. In contrast with Malcolm X's black separatism, Martin Luther King, Jr. offered what he considered "the more excellent way of love and nonviolent protest" as a means of building an integrated community of blacks and whites in America. This lesson will contrast the respective aims and means of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. to evaluate the possibilities for black American progress in the 1960s.