January 10

FDR introduces Lend-Lease Program

January 10, 1941

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 4: FDR and the Lend-Lease Act
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 4: FDR and the Lend-Lease Act

    This lesson shows students how broadly the Lend-Lease Act of March 1941 empowered the federal government—particularly the President—and asks students to investigate how FDR promoted the program in speeches and then in photographs.

Related Student Resources

League of Nations established

January 10, 1920

Related Lessons

  • Lesson 1: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: League of Nations Basics
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Lesson 1: The Debate in the United States over the League of Nations: League of Nations Basics

    American foreign policy resonates with the same issues as the debate over U.S. entry into the League of Nations-collective security versus national sovereignty, idealism versus pragmatism, the responsibilities of powerful nations, the use of force to accomplish idealistic goals, the idea of America. Understanding the debate over the League and the consequences of its ultimate failure provides insight into international affairs in the years since the end of the Great War and beyond. In this lesson, students read the words and listen to the voices of some central participants in the debate over the League of Nations.

Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, “Common Sense,” published anonymously

January 10, 1776

Related Lessons

  • Common Sense: The Rhetoric of Popular Democracy
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    Common Sense: The Rhetoric of Popular Democracy

    This lesson looks at Thomas Paine and at some of the ideas presented in his pamphlet Common Sense, such as national unity, natural rights, the illegitimacy of the monarchy and of hereditary aristocracy, and the necessity for independence and the revolutionary struggle.

Bread and Roses strike begins

January 10, 1912

Related Lessons

  • The Industrial Age in America: Sweatshops, Steel Mills, and Factories
    Lesson Plan / History & Social Studies
    The Industrial Age in America: Sweatshops, Steel Mills, and Factories

    About a century has passed since the events at the center of this lesson-the Haymarket Affair, the Homestead Strike, and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire. In this lesson, students use primary historical sources to explore some of the questions raised by these events, questions that continue to be relevant in debates about American society: Where do we draw the line between acceptable business practices and unacceptable working conditions? Can an industrial-and indeed a post-industrial-economy succeed without taking advantage of those who do the work?