Closer Readings +

Visual Literacy for ELA: House by the Railroad ~ A Painting and Poem

The arts have a central and essential role in achieving the finest aspects of the common core…The great news is that the standards call on so many things the arts do well.Read More »

Welcome Winter (and Valentines Day!) with Emily Dickinson

Winter is good — his Hoar DelightsItalic flavor yieldTo Intellects inebriateWith Summer, or the World —Generic as a QuarryAnd hearty — as a Rose —Invited with AsperityBut welcome when he goes.Read More »

Revisit “Our Town”

Old North Cemetery, Portsmouth, New Hampshire
“Indeed the play's success across cultural borders around the world attests to its being something much greater than an American play: it is a play that captures the universal experience of being alive.”—Donald Margulies, (Foreword) Our Town.Read More »
Categories Closer Readings

Why Do They Call it "The Olympics" Anyway?

The Olympics“Holding an Olympic Games means evoking history.”—Baron Pierre de Coubertin, father of the modern Olympics.As the world turns its eyes this July to London, England, the site of the 2012 Summer Olympics, it will be fun to take the longer view by examining the historical and philosophical significance of the Games in Ancient Greece. In doing so, we should ask: What was it like to compete in or attend the ancient Olympics?Read More »
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FDR's Four Freedoms Speech For the Classroom

The “Four Freedoms” in historical contextOn January 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered his annual State of the Union Address to both houses of Congress. At a time when Western Europe lay under Nazi domination and the United States had not yet entered the war, FDR boldly presented a “post-war” vision in which the American ideals of individual liberties were extended throughout the world. Alerting Congress and the nation to the necessity of war, Roosevelt made one of the most famous political formulations of the 20th century, announcing:Read More »
Categories Closer Readings