Student Interactives for U.S. History: Revolution to Reconstruction

Missouri Compromise Map
Missouri Compromise Map from Early Threat of Secession Interactive

Do your students get more out of classroom time if you incorporate interactives? EDSITEment’s lesson plans are rich in the engaging student activities that can be used in a variety of contexts. Try the interactive maps, timelines—and more—below!

American War for Independence: Interactive Map

Interactive map of the campaigns of the American Revolution in the northern colonies.

The Creation of the Bill of Rights: "Retouching the Canvas"

Interactive map of the first 13 states highlights the ratification process in each state.

An Early Threat of Secession: The Missouri Compromise, 1820–1821

Interactive map illustrating the geography, demography, and political division of the United States as a result of the Missouri Compromise over the issue of Slavery in 1820–21.

The Kansas–Nebraska Act: Interactive Map

Interactive political and demographic map of the U.S. in 1854 that allows users to see the economic, demographic, and political makeup of regions and states at the time.

Lincoln on the American Union: A Word Fitly Spoken

Interactive timeline of Lincoln's most famous speeches.

The American Civil War: on the Eve of the War

Interactive using a series of animated maps to summarize all the factors and statistics on the United States on the eve of the American Civil War.

On the Eve of Civil War: Civil War Commanders

Interactive that introduces the principal generals on both sides of the American Civil War.

Battles of the Civil War: Campaigns Map

Comprehensive animated map showing the locations and travel routes of the major Civil War military campaigns.

The Battle over Reconstruction: Southern Recovery, 1860-1880

Statistical look at Southern recovery, before and after the Civil War.

The Battle over Reconstruction: Impeachment Timeline

Timeline of the events that lead to the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson in 1867.

 

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