Ensure Your National History Day Students Learn from the Experts in 2015

Left: Lynne O’Hara, Director of Programs, NHD, right: Karen Kenton, Senior Progr
Left: Lynne O’Hara, Director of Programs, NHD, right: Karen Kenton, Senior Program Officer, NEH

In just two weeks, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and National History Day (NHD) are introducing the more than 600,000 students who participate in National History Day contests to prominent public historians in a series of NEH Google+ Hangouts.

These sessions give a behind-the-scenes look at NEH-supported exhibitions, films, and online projects. For the second year, a lineup of museum and media professionals offer techniques for historical research and powerful storytelling as well as first-hand strategies for creating engaging performances, documentaries, and exhibits for students who are completing their own projects in these categories. Students can tweet their questions to the experts, who answer them in real time.

January “Ask an Expert” NEH Google+ Hangouts

Want to sample Hangouts from 2014 as well? You can also access them on EDSITEment’s Chronicling America portal.

About National History Day

National History Day is a year-long academic program in which students grades 6–12 conduct original historical research for papers, exhibits, websites, documentaries, and public performances. Each year students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories, and in international schools overseas compete in local, regional, and state competitions for a chance to win a spot at the national finals. Watch an NEH video on the National History Day competition.

EDSITEment, NEH’s educational website, also created a set of online resources around Chronicling America to assist students and educators in using this primary source historical newspaper database to create a winning project.

Comments

Post new comment

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Non-latin text (e.g., å, ö, 漢) will be converted to US-ASCII equivalents (a, o, ?).